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Full text of "Antioch News 07/14/1971"

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15 CENTS PER COPY WEDNESDAY JULY 14, 1971 Vol. LXXXVT No. 4 




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Babe Ruth District Champs - Right to left - Row. 1 - Joe Mihovllovich, Rick Sedar, 
John Meyer, Judd Smith, George Davis, Mitch Witt. 




Row 2 - Mr. Underhill (manager) Mike Perrone, Mike Gutowski, Tom Underhill. 
Mark Maras, Larry Smith, Randy Roberts, Leonard Benning, Ed Writz, Mr. 
Joh*so„ (coach), Mr. Witt (coach). ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 

757 N. MAIN ST. 
ANTIOCH. ILL 60002 



One Liner 



Discipline is something for 
every child to learn but 
the.; the lesson requires a 
wise teacher. \ 




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7 





The following story is taken from a 
taped interview between Mr. James 
Corrigan of the Antioch High School 
Teacher's Association, and the Antioch 
News. The purpose of this interview and 
the one next week is to set forth the 
position of the Antioch Community 
High School Teacher's Association and 
that of the Board of Education in the 
current impasse which exist in the 
welfare negotiations. 

Next week the ANWOCH NEWS will 
present an interview with Mr. Bob 
Lindblad who wilt set forth the position 
of the Board of Education. 



The Antioch News: What is the 
P. N. A. ^(Professional Negotiations 
Agreement)? 

James Corrigan: The Professional 
Negotiations Agreement is the Master 
Agreement or the Master Contract. In 
simple terms it is the rules and 
regulations governing the negotiating 
process. 

There's a section on Parties to the 
Agreement that specifies the board and 
the association. 

There's one on Rights and 
Responsibilities which refers to both the 
board*and the teachers and governs their 
professional behavior in dealing with 
each other in establishing a new 
contract. 

The matter of recognition is covered 
where the board recognizes the 
association as the sole and exclusive 
negotiating representative for all the 
teachers. 




You see it really governs the pattern 
for yearly negotiations for salaries, and 
. so on. 

There's a section here on the 
Uninterrupted Service Clause, which is 
the so-called "no strike" clause, which, 
at this time, puts all the levers in the 
, hands of the board. We didn't like the 
fact that the IE A (Illinois Education 
Association) agreed to this (last fall) the 
way it's written. What it means is that 
there shall be absolutely no interrupting 
of service. There can be no strike ami, 
also, if the master contract or PNA is 
not rewritten and agreed to by the end 
of the school year, then the terms of 
this (contract) will continue in effect 
for another six months. That means that 
the no-strike clause will remain in effect 
until the next contract is written. So 
you can't even theoretically, stay out at 
the beginning of the next school year 
even if you don't have a contract. 

The Antioch News: What is impasse? 

% Corrigan: "An impasse occurs after 
both parties have considered the 
proposals and counter-proposals of the 
other party in good faith and when, 
despite such diligent efforts, no 
- agreement can be reached on the subject 
being negotiated. During the course of 
negotiations, the respective committees 
shall make every good faith effort to 
reach agreement on all issues before 
invoking the following procedure" and 
then the impasse procedure is set up. 
This year's impasse procedure says that 
when impasse occurs the Federal 
Mediation and Conciliation Service shall 



be requested to appoint a mediator 
from its regular staff. He will then come 
in and try to mediate the dispute. When 
you get to the point where both sides 
are at opposite ends of the pole and 
further discussion produces nothing but 
heated tempers and arguments, it's 
standard procedure to have a mediator 
come in. A mediator, a go-between, who 
gets between the two and asks, 'What 
can we do?' People think this is rather 
strange. It isn't. It's now standard 
procedure. . 

It's human nature, I think, to want 
to have a problem' solved in the best 
way possible, and when two parties 
can't see. eye-to-eye, it's sometimes 
possible for a third party to be able to 
do the job. At least this is what is to be 
hoped. 

There's a ringer in this thing which 
I'll mention to you. I didn't know about 
this until yesterday. Both - sides must 
request the mediator, and at this time, 
the board is going to have a meeting to 
decide whether or not they are going to 
join in requesting the mediator. 

This is confusing. The master 
agreement clearly states that when 
impasse is ^ declared, "The Federal 
Mediation and Conciliation Service shall 
be requested by the parties,", plural, "by 
the parties to appoint a mediator from 
its regular staff." That is in the master 
agreement, which the board signed and 
ratified. . . Now they're meeting to try 
to determine whether or not they are 
going to do this, 



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The Antioch News: 
does a mediator have? 



What power 





Corrigan: At the present time what 
we have by way of mediation is nothing 
but advisory-it's not binding. ' 

Now, there is a bill before the 
legislature, it's already been passed by 
the House, that says that binding 1 
arbitration . shall become the law of the 
state for all public institutions. Now if 
this is ratified by the . Senate, the 
mediator will come and the two parties 
will thrash it out 'til it's acceptable. 
Then, whatever middle ground exists, 
that will be it, and the board and 
teachers will have to accept it because it- 
will be the law of the state/ f 

Currently, the mediator's role is 
simply advisory. 

The Antioch News: Has there been 
any agreement between the teachers and 
the board that the teachers will accept 
the findings of the mediator? ; i 

Corrigan: The teachers have gone on 
record as being willing to accept the 
final recommendations of the mediator 
after the mediation process has run its 
course. 

The Antioch News: Just what are 
the teachers asking for? ^ , 

Corrigan: The teachers proposed an 
increase at the first meeting that the 
board - committee said was a "more 1 
modest request than they had expected. 
They came back later and said no raises 



Cont'd on Page 2 



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THE JWTIOCH i NEWS, 



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WED, r , JULY 14, 1971 



Page 2 



Cont'd from page 1 





; Our position is. 



for anyone on the staff. They did say 
everyone. The superintendent 
administrative staff, bus 
drivers- every one. Since they did not 
alter- their<proposal from this year's 
figures, we did not come down on ours. ■ 
Otherwise, we'd be negotiating against 
ourselves. 

Simply, the teachers would be willing 
to accept an' increase that would do 
ample justice ta the Increased cost of 
living. Plus, a reasonable package of 
fringe benefits and working conditions. 
In other words, we're not out to break 
the district. 

The Antioch News; Do the teachers 
basically agree that the district is short 
of funds?.. 

Corrigan: The IEA accountant said 
last spring that if this district were still 
on the accrual system of accounting, the 
district would show a surplus in excess 
of $200,000. But, because the school 
went to the cash system of accounting, 
they showed, in the Spring, that they 
..were just about even. 
- The situation is tighter than it was t 
but it does not appear to be crucial. 

If you want to know the real reason 
why finances are tight it's because the 
people in this district have been 
notorious for voting down referendums 
and bond issues. I can't remember when 
the people in Antioch have supported 
an educational tax increase. It .is our 
belief that they have never really voted 
in the funds to run the school. There are 
very few schools in the state that has a 
lowere tax rate than ours. 

People in this district have produced 
the children which have flooded the 
schools. They have doubled the school 
enrollment in 10 years. But, not once 
. during that time have they voted in the 
necessary funds to take care of the 
increase in operational costs. They have 
depended on the state- legislature to 
come in with 'backdoor* referendums. 

The board has the responisbility to 
convince the people of the district of 
the need for an increase in the amount 
of revenue necessary to run the school 
district. Here is where the pinch comes. 
Not . that the teachers have gotten 
increases which are out of line with 
what's going on in this country-but, the 
fact that the staff has doubled in size in 
10 years. 

A member of the board negotiating 
team told me that 'if we have to run 
T that~sChool~with 10-teachers- if- the 
academic program has to suffer, it will 
suffer. The important thing is that we 
stay in the black!' This is not the way to 
run an educational system. Because, 
when you start to do that, it's the kkids 
that suffer. 



The. Antioch News: Would you say 
that last year's situation has had any 
influence, directly or indirectly,, on this 
year's problem? 

Corrigan: Now, the reason we hit 
the street last year was because, arid I 
don't have a copy of the old level III 
agreement with me, but the essence is, 
that upon entering impasse both sides 
would choose two professional 
negotiators who would be called in, and 
if they could not resolve the problem 
between them then those two would' 
decide on a mutually agreeable third 
party who would come in and make a 
recommendation based upon the 
arguments presented by the two 
professional negotiators. 
\ This is the way the thing was written. 
This is what the board ratified. Now, we 
ran into an impasse because the board 
would not okay the index. Well,' the 
index was what we were fighting for so 
we said bring in your third party. And 
the board said 'no'. Now, they ratified 
an agreement that said a third party 
would come in and make a 
recommendation. If that third party had 
come in and said, 'look, the district is in 
bad shape, you have to drop the index,' 
we would have gone the route of the 
professional negotiations agreement and 
we would have said okay. Becuase it 
came as an outside recommendation, we 

would have accepted It But, in effect, 
what the board did was to violate the 
terms of the agreement which they had 
signed and, if effect, kicked the teachers 



right out on the sidewalk. 

The fact that the board did not 
honor the full meaning of last year's 
level II Agreement made the entire 
professional staff wary. 

(Regarding this year's 
negotiations)the teachers will, most 
assuredly, insist upon doing within the 
bounds of legality to achieve an 
equitable settlement. We are unwilling 
to accept an arbitrary statement about 
finances without going the full route of 
the impasse procedure as set down in 
the PNA. :? v 

No One likes defeat without going 
the full route to make sure that no 
stone has been left untured to make 
sure that the picture has been painted 
accurately. 

The Antioch News: Is this problem 
with the board in any way a contest? 

Corrigan: Absolutely not 

The Antioch News: Was the fact of 
reaching impasse in any way 
predetermined? 

Corrigan: Absolutely not We were 
so optimistic after our first meeting that 
we had (with the board representatives) 
thatrwe- were- virtually- convinced that 
things could be worked out this year. 
We were looking for a very early 
settlement 

When the board becomes arbitrary, 
one can't help but wonder if the board 
is 'spanking' the teachers for having 
been so "naughty" as to have struck, 
(last Fall). 

To the extent that the teachers feel 
that the board is not doing right by the 
teachers-and to the extent that the 
teachers feel that the community is 
being a bit unfair by voting down a 
referendum-8 to 1, for example-then, if 
there is any contest at all it is merely a 
contest to get the people of the 
community to really understand where 
the teachers stand in this total business 
of professional negotiations. It's not a 
contest as far as the actual negotiations 
themselves are concerned. The idea of a - 
contest between the board and the 
teachers becomes grotesque- that's game 
playing. 

We're not playing games. 
- The Antioch News: Has Mr. 
Saunders of the IEA had any part in the 
teacher's involvement with the board 
this year? 

Corrigan: No. The only thing that 
Mr. Saunders has done is arranging for 
the IEA auditor to look at the books. 
Another thing was I called him to have 
him explain the proper procedure for_ 
filing for the federal mediator 

He is not actively working with the 
teachers. 

The Antioch News: Are the teachers 
agreeable to another strike-if so, at what 
point and for what reason? 

Corrigan: We don't want to strike 
now any more than we wanted to strike 
last Fall. We would not have been out 
last Fall if the board had not violated 
the PNA agreement The teachers still 
do not like the idea of a strike. I don't 
like the idea of a strike. Nobody else 
does. 1 cannot, at this time, picture a 
situation where the teachers would go 
out on strike-unless there is a drastic 
change in the situation. 

The Antioch News: What do you 
think would cause the teachers and 

board to settle? '■£. 

Corrigan: The one thing that could 
cause a settlement without an outside 
negotiator coming in would be for the 
' board to realize the full extent of the 
contribution being made to this school 
system by the teachers. I honestly don't 
believe that the board of education has 
a sound idea, a professional idea, as to 
the kind of contribution the teaching 
staff has made ot the kids in this 
community and to the reputation of the 
school itself. It has been a pretty good 
reputation. And it just seems to me that 
they're unwilling to properly 
remunerate an extremely fine teaching 
staff. If the board can realize that the 
simple fact of staying in. the black, 

especially when they are at 
'rock-bottom' where the tax level is 
concerned, is not as important as the 
on-going quality ojf the education itself. 
If they could realize this, then I think 
the board would be in a position to 
: say/yes/ now let's see if we can do a 



i ..... :.' ..".■ j"""- ^ /^u^JhOitasutmimaBaBa 



little something for the teachers,' 

Until something like that happens, I 
can't see anything changing other than 
this continuation of beating our heads 
against each other. 

The Antioch News: Do you feel that 
this trouble we are now having will, 
unfortunately, become an annual item? 

Corrigan: Until such time as there is . 
a change in the philosophy of the board 
regarding the 'contributions of the 
teaching staff or the rewriting of state 
laws giving teachers a bit more, I have to 
use this term, it has union overtones, 
bargaining power. Right now, all the • - 
resources are on the side of the board of 
education. Until one of both of those 
things comes into the picture, it's going 
to be terribly rough each year. You have 
a highly:, professional group of people . ; 
who are having to beg for every bit of 
consideration- monetary or otherwise. 

The Antioch News: Has the board of 
education in any way broken the PNA 
agreement? 

Corrigan: This year, you mean? 

The Antioch News: Yes. 
.: Corrigan: Not this year. 

The Antioch News: You mentioned 
union overtones earlier, have the 
teachers talked or, in any way 
considered, going union? 

Corrigan: I don't know when it's 
going to happen-the IEA and the AFT' 
(American , Federation of Teachers), 
have talked merger very seriously over 
the past year. Both, presidents of the 
two groups ran on a platform of 
unification. Such unification would 
certainly give the teaching profession a 
bit more of a lever. 

I don't believe that the union can 
make a contribution to the teaching 
profession from a purely academic 
standpoint. I think that, what the union 
can do, is give the teachers a bit mor 
bargaining power. To that extent I don't 
think there's much value in going plain 
union-but, if the union and the IEA 
merged, it seems to me. that both of 
them would become a little bit stronger. 7 

The Antioch News: With the union 
and the association, on a national basis, 
moving closer together toward a union 
type coalition will this in any way 
detracted from the term 'professional* 
teacher? 

Corrigan: When you talk to a board 
of education about the professional 
teacher or the dedicated tacher, they 
think of one who is willing to work 
without adequate remuneration. As 
soon as a teacher asks for money he 
becomes an unprofessional teacher. The 
boards asks, ^Whate ver became of the^ 
dedicated teacher who was willing to 
accept what could be offered?" To 
them this is dedication. Such a situation 
undermines the morale of the staff to 
the point where the district is going to 
go down the drain. Unless they're 
willing to provide enough money to 
attract good people into this profession. 
When someone on the outside looks in 
and sees the teachers asking for more 
money right away they think that this is 
greediness. What they don't realize is. 
that when you have a highly paid 
profession it cannot help, in the long 




run, but lure more, competent people 
into the' professions ;£ It's 'common 
knowledge that highly competent 
people have gotten out ot the profession 
for a variety of reasons, but mainly 
because they found out they could 
make a lot more money somewhere 
elde. Until the people in this country 
realize that the desire to have the 
remuneration kept in line with the 
service rendered is not an unprofessional 
attitude-then the sooner we're going to 
have a healthy situation, in ' the 
educational field. "V 

Now back to the union. The union Is 
in a position to help in the matter of 
professional remjneration. If that: can 
help to keep competent people in the 
profession, or can bring more 
competent people into the profession, 
then the union has provided a definitely 
professional service. This is where the 
union can be a valuable thing. ' 

The union is not highly sophisticated 
in the area of specific educational needs, 
although, I think they have been 
working in that direction. 

Somehow, when the teachers try to 
do something positive about their 
remjneration r they are. labled 
unprofessional. You realize as well as I 
do that if the doctors In this country 
were suddenly to be paid through 
taxation, you'd have a war, you'd have 
people dropping out of the. medical 
profession-unless they couldn't do 
anything else. Do you have any idea 
how the doctors would storm if their 
fees were decided by the whim of voting 
public? 

When our professionalism is 
dependent on a board which thinks 
more of black ink than high level 
education, and upon pepole who will 
not vote the necessary taxes to educate 
the , children they have flooded the 
school system with -then the situation 
becomes very one-sided. If (the union) 
can help get the salaries up to the point 
where we can maintain a competent 
staff, then there is an argument for the 
union. . 



GEORGE OLISAR 
FEATURED AS GUEST 
SOLOIST 

George disar^ director of 
the Antioch Grade .School 
Band, was recently featured as 
guest trumpet soloist with the 
Racine Municipal Band. 

The Racine Band is a muni- 
cipal organization sponsored 
by the City of Racine to bring 
live band music to the residents 
of Racine during the summer 
months. 

Mr. Olisar played the well 
known Sammy Nestico trum- 
pettune called "APortrait for- 
Trumpet". As an encore 
LeRoy Anderson's "A Trum- 



peter's Lullaby" was played. 

Later this summer Mr. 
Olisar will again be featured 
but as a guest conductor. 







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.THE INDEPENDENT PAPER DEDICATED JO THE" 
THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS OF THE PEOPLE OF 

AN710CH 




JOSEPH T RUSH 
BARBARA RUSH 



PUBLISHER,EDITOR 
BUSINESS MANAGER 



Member of: , 
Illinois Press Association and National Newspaper Association 

Annual subscription $5.00. Single copy 15 cent9, Entered as Second Class 
matter' at Antioch, 111. post office. In case of change of address or 
non-delivered copies, notify the publisher, 141 Cheri Lane; Antioch, 111, 
305-6554. 




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staff: 

Charles Becker- Advertising manager 

Karen Sheehan - Staff writer 

Ken Smouse • Staff Writer 

Mrs. Del Jahneke -Beach Grove 

Representative- 395-1145 -— 




Wilderness Preserve 



n : »: 



ressman 



iypy 




FT. SHERIDAN TO STAY 

Congressman Robert 
McClory (R-Ill) has learned 
from "reliable sources at the 
Pentagon*' that a staff plan has 
been prepared recommending 
'Backfilling* the facilities at Ft. 
Sheridan vacated as a result of 
the consolidation and removal 
of Fifth Army units to Ft. Sam 
Houston, Texas. 

The _ soHBaljecJL backfilling* 

plan includes utilization of Ft. 
Sheridan by active and reserve 
activities-units already in the 
Chicago area as well as the 
transfer to Ft. Sheridan of 
other appropriate activities and 
units. 

According to information 
received by the 12th District 
Congressman,- all of the per- 
manent facilities at Ft. Sheri- 
dan would be fully utilized as 
well as 90% of the temporary 
installations. 

The staff study envisions a 
permanent emplacement at Ft. 



■ WED.V^JULY 14/ 



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Sheridan of 1,258 military per- 
sonnel and 1,340 civilian 
personnel. These personnel are 
ih addition to military depend- 
ents now at Ft. Sheridan. 

In- addition, the staff plan 
'calls for the use of Ft. Sheridan 
by students attending service 
school at Ft. Sheridan on a 
temporary basis in support of 
Fifth Army activities. 

Con gressman McClory 
explained that the 'backfilling* 
plan which is nearing final ap- 
proval is in lieu of an alternate 
proposal which contemplated 
the vacating and abandonment 
of Ft. Sheridan as a military 
post. Congressman McClory 
' stated that he is not at liberty 
to disclose the source of this 
report pending the final dec- 
ision. The Congressman added: 
"I fully expect that the plan 
to retain Ft. Sheridan as a 
military post for the many 
important missions which it 
performs for the active and 
reserve military forces, as well 
as for servicemen and their 
families, will be approved and 
will receive general public sup- 
port. The transfer of additional 
units to. Ft._ Sheridan. jdU pro- 
vide the full utilization of 
which this historic base is cap- 
able." 

The impending Pentagon 
action comes shortly after 
fheformal resolution of the 
City of Highland Park urging 
retention of Ft. Sheridan. The 
American Federation of Gov- 
ernment Employees, the Assoc- 
iation of the U.S. Army and 
many other civic and public 
groups and officials have 
pledged' support for Congress- 
man McClory's efforts to keep 
Ft. Sheridan. 



Letters 



' 



I like the ANTIOCH NEWS. 
Especially the receipe idea. I 
would like to add one for, 
making. . ..it is delicous. 

Mrs. Emma RobUn 
(note) Mrs Roblin's delicous 
receipe will be in the "Cooks 
Corner" next week so be sure 
to look for it. Favorite receipes 
for the seasons will be most 
welcome. Also any household 
hints will be greatly 
appreciated. Thanks B 



I am enclosing my check for 
$5.00 for your paper. 

I liaise been_ getting the 
Antioch News for over 50 
years, -r .„ _ 

My late Father had the 1st 
bakery in Antioch at Lake and 
Main Si. 

Lotus and I like Benson 
Ariz. Wc are 42 miles south 
and east of Tucson Ariz. 

Good luck with your paper. 

I am, 

T.Earlc Somcrville . 

P.O. Box C-l 

Benson, Ariz. 85602 



BUY IT 




.■ 





In addition to the promised student educational 
value, the preservation and development of the natural 
wildlife on the Antioch Upper Grade School site appears 
to be an extremely worthwhile project for community 
participation. 

More than . just an educational facility for the 
youngsters, this proposal involves inviting townspeople 
with a flair for some area of nature study to share their 
knowledge and enthusiasm with the students. 
Sportsmen and ecology clubs can involve more people in 
their projects while also utilizing the site for their 
enjoyment. 

Perhaps we will eventually have a nature 
demonstration center benefiting our community as well 
as many others by our preservation and display of 
wildlife. 

In omv world where ecology is so much a part of our 
lives, the Upper Grade School site will offer an area 
of learning,- preservation and beauty. 

. Most important of all, optimum educational usage of 
the area includes introduction of preschoolers through 
high school age to an advanced awareness of nature, 
often missed in the classroom. . * 

The land planners hot only offer a long term full 
preparation of the land itself, but also include a teacher 
training plan; thus, our youngsters would develope an 
intelligent awareness of the world around them and of 
the ecological problems of today. 

Development of the Antioch Upper Grade School 
site promises to be a project which will gradually 
become a more and more fruitful part of our 
community. 



We've been glad to share our first four issues of the new 
ANTIOCH NEWS with everyone in Antioch. 

We hope that you have enjoyed reading it as much as it 
has pleased us to present this publication. 



If you would like to continue receiving the newspaper 
''dedicated to the thoughts and feelings of the people of 
Antioch", SUBSCRIBE NOlvV^ ^ 



Just clip out this handy coupon and mail it to the 
ANTIOCH NEWS, 141 Cheri Lane. DO IT NOW! 




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STORY ON THE DEVELOPMENT 
OF THE UPPER GRADE 



SITE ON PAGE 18 




Dear Subscriber: 



This handy form is included for your convenience. Simply send 
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Postal regulations governing the mailing of newspapers require 
that all subscriptions be paid in advance, i j 



Early return, of your form will insure that you do not miss any 
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Thank you 
THK ANTIOCH NEWS 














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THE ANTIOCH NEWS 



WED., JULY 14, i&71 




Page 4 



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Machine I 



Lawson Aboard 
USS Midway 

Navy Petty Officer Third 
Class Daniel L. Lawson, 
husband of the former Miss 
Karen L. Banky of Antioch, 111. 
is now deployed to the Western 
Pacific aboard the attack, 
aircraft carrier USS Midway for 
duty with the U.S. Seventh 
Fleet. 



71 YEARS AGO, JULY 19, 1900 , ! 

"The residence of Gideon Thayer has been treated to a new 
coat. of paint." 

\ "Don't forget to attend the Wednesday evening dance at the 
Antioch opera house." 

"The Jolly Dozen gave one of their pleasant parties last 
Thursday evening at the. home of Miss Gertie Smart." 




50 YEARS AGO, JULY 14, 1921 

"Norman Burnett's silo was blown over during the storm last 
Thursday." 

"Mrs. Elizabeth Wilton passed away Sunday evening at the age 
of 81 years." , 

L i"Mr._and Mrs. I.L. Pad dock enjoyed an_auto trip to 

-j Indianapolis,' Ind., and visited their daughter Marguerite, Mr. and 
Mrs. I.A. Forster and little son of Chicago. Miss Belle Hughes and 
Miss Emelie Forbick accompanied them." 
Trevor - Mrs. Dayton of Antioch visited Mrs. L. Mickle Friday. 

40 YEARS AGO, JULY 16, 1931 * 

Old Eagle Eye says. . . 

"Lon Runyard says that he has learned to roll his own, but we 
guess Marshall Brogan will see to it that he doesn't mean his 
socks." . 

ad: NEW NASH 
Take a Sound-proof Ride! 

Main Service Station, A. Maplethorpe 

.... 

30 YEARS AGO, JULY 10, 1941 

d*d "Best Buick Yet" 
$930 for the Business Coupe including Compound Carburetion 
Berhie C. Koolman, 835 Main St. Antioch 

The Antioch Girl Scout troop entertained their mothers at a 

- Mother- Daughter tea. The program included talks by Joan 

Hughes, Joan Felter, and Jane Nelson on earning badges. A piano 

solo was given by Barbara Horton and a tap dance by Joan Felter 

and Vida Haley. 

"Mrs. Iza Henry and Mrs. Bessy Kaiser write to Mrs. H.B. 
Gaston from Juneau, Alaska, 'While in Fairbanks, we met an 
Antioch boy who kept talking about the Gastons ■ George 
Wetzel!"' 

20 YEARS AGO, JULY 12, 1951 

Chain O' Lakes Cleaners will move its downtown shop from 
the basement room beneath the Baethke barber shop to the north 
room o f Mrs. J. B. Fields Building across the street in about tWo 



weeks, Louis Mowen, manager announced. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Frolick have purchased Club Villa on Rte. 
21 north of Lake Villa. \ 

Oscar I. Onsted, a resident of Lake Catherine, has been elected 
commander of the Antioch Post American Legion for the year of 
1951-1952. 



, Looking for a particular 
book? The Antioch Township 
Library would be happy to 
order .any available book that 
they don't have from the 
Rockford Library. This is . one^ 
of the many services at our 
local "book nook". 

New books at the Antioch 
Township Library include: 

WHAT DO YOU HEAR FROM 
WALDEN POND? by Jack 
Douglas, The celebrated writer 
recounts the exploits which 
followed when he was lured 
from his home in the Canadian 
wilds to write for a Holly wood 
comic. 

JINGO DJANGO by Sid 
Fleischman. A frolicking and 
suspenseful story of a stalwart 
orphan, a treasure map, gypsies 
and a transcontinental chase in 
Jingo Hawks' search for his 
little- remembered father. 

THE RETIREMENT 
HANDBOOK by Joseph C. 
Buckley. A complete planning 
guide offers information on 
Medicare, retirement towns, 
careers in small business and 
Social Security benefits. 

THE GHOSTS THAT WALK 
IN WASHINGTON by Hans 
Holzer. The ill-fated Kennedys, 
Mrs.' Dickey's ghostly 
-companions, Woodrow Wilson, 
all visited in a stimulating new 
book. 

Hours at the Antioch 
Township Library 'are:. Daily 
Noon to 5 p.m., Sat 10 am. to 
5 p.m. 




A.F.S. 

LAUGH 
TIME IS HERE 

It's time to see the 
"A.F.S. FESTIVAL OF 
COMEDY" in the Antioch High 
School auditorium at 8 p.m. 
tonight, July 14. 

Help to finance Antioch 
High School's 6th foreign 
exchange student The "A.F.S. 
FESTIVAL OF COMEDY''. 
schedule is: 

July 14 - "The Great Race", 
starring Jack Lemrrion and 
Tony Curtis, plus a cartoon 

July 28 • "Comedy Shorts", 
featuring W.C. Fields, Charlie 
Chaplin, Laurel and Hardy, 
Abbott & Costello and Mae 
West 

Aug. 11 - "The Lavender Hill 
Mob", starring Alec Guineas, 
plus 3 carjoons 




Tickets will-be sold at the door. 



RECOVERY TEAM 
FINDS BODY 



The Antioch Underwater 
Recovery Team recovered the 
body of Michael J. Brady at 
Timberlake ' Park, Antioch, 
early Sunday morning. 

Mr. Brady was a 28 year old 
Chicago resident' He had 
apparently been swimming 
near the. raft when the 
drowning occurred. ...'-'. 

The Recovery Team was 
called at 6:30 a.m.. They 
reached the scene and began 
their recovery strategy. Within 
45 minutes the body had been 
recovered. 

Survivors include his wife 
' arid several children. v \- 




• 




toff* . 

W fiwHr ii nmUJtf, 

mm 



EVERY WEDNESDAY — UNTIL SEPT. 1 
Featuring flit Alpino Serenade™ 

Per Pewon . .. . . $3.85 
Children (under 10) $2.50 




v 




CERTIFICATES 

OF EXCELLENCE 
AWARDED 



FLUSHING, N.Y., George 
Hahn and Ken Smith of Hahn's 
Jewelry of Antioch both, 
received Certificates of 
Excellence in the Bulova 
Advanced Accutron Training 
Program held at the Broadview 
Service and Training Center in 
Chicago. 

According to Don De Wolf, 
Field Training Service Manager, 
both men received the highest 
certificate possible, displaying 
excellence in the horological 
(time-measurement) 
profession. 

This intensive training 
program helps jewelers' to ' be 
aware of the many intricate 
advancements in the field of 
time measurement. 




ssn^WWWWWWWVIII! 

IS -"~ m 



945MAIN ST. ANTIOCH 395-0521 



on all summer merchandise 

MEN'S, LADIES', BOYS', & GIRLS' 



Off 



[With the exception of Jantzen 
Men's & Boy's Swim Wear & 
I Buster Brown Knit Wear. 



/ 






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A Modem New Look 



and a Broad New Concept to Banking at our New Location at 485 Lake Street 



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Don't Forget — Start Your New Account and Your Cutlery 
Set Today. Free Freezer Knife with New Savings Account or 
$25.00 Addition to Savings. , 



in! ■ I! 



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* 





Satellite Facility, a Complete Drive Up Banking 
Service in the Antioch Shopping Center. Another 
1st for First National , 






"YOU* ItW TO THE FUTUW 




AT LAKE AND MAIN STREETS 
ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 60002 

395-3111 



■ •;,!. i,i 



.SS^S 



Lake .Couhtys IstlTV Drive Op Window, a Move to the Present Bank Building - 
andMany NewBanking Methods. 



. 



A GreatBanking Heretage Began in 1926 on Lake Street as the 1st National 
Bank Began Serving the People of Antioch. 






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THE ANTIOCH NEWS 




WED. f JULY 14, 1971 




^^^^^ • 



COOKING 



sP 






BE A 'COOL' COOK THIS SUMMER. Serve the modern new 
salad- TACO SALAD 



1 lb. ground beef 
2 A cup water 
1 Ig tomato cut up 
V^c. green pepper (opt) 
1 C. shredded cheese 



V£ envelope or Vic. dry onion soup 
lined, head lettuce (about 4C) 
1 small onion sliced in rings , 
V&c. sliced ripe olives 
1 — 6oz pkg corn chips 





In skillet brown meat. 
Sprinkle onion mix. over meat, 
add water. Simmer, uncovered 
for 10 minutes. Put rest of 
ingrediences in large salad bowl. 
Top with meat and then corn 
chips. Hot taco sauce or ketsup 
may be used sparingly over top. 




SAFETY 
SENSE ! 

by Sam Safely 
American 



Optical Corp. 



HOME SAFETY QUIZ 

Since most accidents occur 
in the home, household safety 
should be high on your list of 
family priorities. ' 
«£ Accordingly — here's a 
quick quiz to test your home 
safety awareness: ., « 

1. True or false, — falls 
cause more fatalities in the 
home than any other kind of 
accident. 

2. You can put put a frying 
" pan grease fire with ordinary 





Wednesday, July 14 

A.F.S. Festival of Comedy, "The Great Race" plus a 
cartoon, 8 p.m. 

Friday, July 16 

AARP bus trip to Great Lakes Naval Training Center 
St. Ignatius Church Rummage Sale-Bake Sale* 

* • • 

Saturday, July 17 

St. Ignatius Church Rummage Sale-Bake Sale 

Babe Ruth League Tournament - Antioch vs. West Cicero at 

High School Field, 2 p.m. 

Antioch Little League Pancake Breakfast at the Antioch 

Methodist Church 7 a.m. til 1 p.m. 

Sunday, July 18 

Prince of Peace Chicken Barbecue 1 to 5 p.m. 

Wednesday, July 21 

Regular meeting of Lakeside Rebekah Lodge 82 

* ■ * 

Thursday, July 22 ' , 

.'.Lakeside Rebekah Lodge Card Party & Refreshments at 
. American Legion Hall, 12:30 p.m. 

Friday, July 23, 24, 29, 30, 31 

PM&L "The Fantasticks" - a musical comedy, 8:30 p.m. 

Sunday, July 25 

Antioch Chamber of Commerce King Bros. Circus, Rt. 173 
at McMillan Rd. Shows at 2 and 5 p.m. 

Tuesday, July 27 

Antioch Township Library Board meeting 3 p.m. 

Wednesday/July 28 , 

A.F.S. Festival of Comedy, 8 p.m. "Comedy Shorts", 
featuring the all-time greats of comedy 



Thursday, July 29-31 

- Antioch Maxwell Street Days 

Sunday, August 1 

Antioch Lions Club Chicken Barbecue 

Wednesday, August 4 

Republican Club Auxiliary Vietnam Picnic, 12 Noon 



(a) powdered detergent; (b) 
flour; (c) baking soda; (d) 
water. 

3. Where can. home crafts- 
men get special goggles and 
respirators to protect eyes and 
lungs from workshop hazards? 

4. As a rule, prescription 
medicines should be discarded . 
after (a) ,3 months; (b) 6 
months; (c) one year; (d) the 
illness for which they were pre- 
scribed has passed. 

5. True or false — cuts are 
the most common home 
accident. 

6. What's the best way to 
pick up small bits and slivers of 
broken glass? -pAto* 
iadsd dump e qiiM-g '. x-g i(p)-fr 
too; oj pttat) ..uiojj ^uaiudmba 
X?ajes Ajddns oqM 'sjajeap 
aui[ajug iean d O ueauauiv JPM* 
We t(3)-S ; JrT :SH3MSNV 




1ht Old limuis 




"The best way to help 
your youngsters with their 
home work Is not to." 




; Page 6 



Circus visits 








THE TRUE AMERICAN 
CIRCUS, COMPLETE WITH 
"BIG TOP", WILD ANIMALS. 
FLYING BANNERS, SAW- 
DUST AND PINK LEMON- 
ADE WILL BE ON HAND 
WHEN THEBIG KING BROS. 
THREE RING CIRCUS 
MAKES ITS APPEARANCE 
IN ANTIOCH on Sunday July 
25 at Rt 173 & McMillan Road 
for performances at 2:00 & 

5:00 P.M. under the sponsor- 
ship of the Antioch Chamber 
of Commerce. 

The show travels in a con- 
voy of giant trucks and trailers 
and carries an administrative 
and working jcrew jrf over. 100 
people,/ The first all-modern 
circus, the big show has been 
completely rebuilt and mod- 
ernized to make possible the/ 
handling of this huge project 
which normally exhibits seven 
days a week, in seven different 
towns. The "Big Top" has a 
forty week season which will 
take them from their opening 
stand in Florida to over thirty 
states and three Canadian Pro- 



vinces and back to the Gulf 
Coast where the show will go 
into winter quarters to make 
ready for their 1972 season. 

The show is on its 68th 
annual tour and carries about 
every type of circus act in- 
cluding many, animal acts and 
personalities that ' have - ap- 
peared on the HOLLYWOOD 
PALACE, ED SULLIVAN and 
other variety TV shows. 

The Chamber of Commerce 
and the three Antioch banks 
and the Lake Villa Trust & 
Savings Bank are selling a 
limited * number of tickets for 
$1.25 and "$2.00. The advan- 
tages of buying an advance 
ticket from the sponsor are : 
The buyer saves 20 per cent on 
an adult ticket over the door 
price; charged Circus Day, and 
the Chamber of Commerce re- 
ceives 50 per cent commission 
on all advance sales. As no* 
advance tickets will be sold 
Circus Day,. everyone is urged 
to buy their tickets before mid- 
night preceding Circus Day. 

The funds from the circus 
sponsorship will be used for 
the various Chamber of Com- 
merce activities such as heli- 
coptor rides and the Maxwell 
Street Days. 



Stop Smoking. 
DEPOLLUTE 




JULY 



ANTIOCH - Rt 173 at McMillan Road 

MAFT. &NTTE 
MIDWAY OPEN 1 & 4 p.m. 



SHOWS AT 2 & 5 p.m. 



Sponsored by Antioch Chamber of Commerce 




3fciu 



POPULAR 
PRICES 



ACRES OF TENTS 



WILD ANIMALS 
ELEPHANTS 



K-tf 



i nn minutes i nn 

I UU THRILLS-LAUGHS I UO 



WORLD FAMOUS CIRCUS STARS 



ALL NEW THIS YEAR 



^^ AVE ADVANCE TICKETS AT REDUCED PRICES C A \/t <4> 
W ^ MVE TICKETS ON SALE NOW OMYCW 

Reserved & Admission Tickets Sold Circus Day at Show Grounds 




hursday, August 5-8 

St. Peter's Country Fair on Parish Grounds 



ORENZ'S is the answer to your search for 
the perfect dinner 
. . . the best Entertainment, 

or Parties! 
the most memorable Receptions 
Fri. spec Fish plate $1.95 
Wi// JL ¥ yJ|395»421 1 1 Shore Plate 2 - 50 

lilfHWAV 179 Lobster tails 460 

WEST OF 59 Entertainment Fri. & Sat. 

^SrriOCH CLOSED TUESDAY 

I MEMBER OF DINERS C LUB AND AMERICAN EXPRESSl 






356-7890 




147 





•f 






WE DO YOUR PRINTING IMMEDIATELY 



Church Reports 

Letterheads 

.Circulars 



• Form Letters 

• Directories 

• Maps 




OR SOONER 

• Office Forms 

• Mentis 

• Price Lists 



Wedd ing Invitations, 

8% x 11 - 20# White Bond 




UP TO 1000 



.40 



14.50 



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Page -7 



■ - - ■ ;.-■■ .■■■■■.. 

VILLAGE 
BOARD 

Sewer lines (new and 
faulty), building complaints 
and requests, clarification of 
towing policy, trains running 
too fast, glorified burglar 
alarms, and the annual 
appropriation made up a full 
evening of business for the 
Antioch Village Board at its 
regular meeting, Tuesday, 
evening, July 6. 

A low bid of $7,506.25 
awarded the contract to install 
a storm sewer from the Pickard 
Company plant to the Antioch 
Lumber Co. to C & 1 
Construction of Kenosha. It is 
hoped that construction will 
begin early to alleviate, as 
quickly as possible, the 
flooding problems at Pickard. 
Another water problem 
exists on North Avenue near 
Gary's Drive due to an 
apparently faulty storm sewer. 
~~ The village plans to take action 
to make the original sewer - 
contractor fix the problem or 
the village will condemn the 
line and fix it themselves. 
Either way, the residents of the 
area are assured the problem 
will be solved. : 

Alice Cunningham came 
before the board to clarify her 
request for two building 
permits in the Village Green 
Subdivision. After some 
corrections Were made the 
permits were issued. 
i A request regarding permits 
to build apartments was 
submitted by Merrill 
Cunningham but no action was 
taken at this time. 

A complaint was brought 
before the. board ; by a Mr. 
Oilmen regarding a home being 
built in Oakwood Knolls by 
the H&B Builders. Walter 
Delany, village building 
inspector, was directed to 
investigate the charge. 

The operator of Bill's 
Service Station requested 
clarification of village policy 
regarding towing calls made by 
the police department Police 
Chief Jack Davis was asked to 
see to it that; unless a specific 
towing request is made by the 
parties involved, such towing . 
calls be divided among the 
various wrecker services as 
equally as possible. 

It would appear to at least 
one citizen of Antioch that the 
Soo Line trains pass through 
the village too fast A question 
was raised as to why such 
excessive speed was necessary. 
The board directed its attorney 
to write to the Soo Line 
advising them of the complaint 
and requesting clarification of 
the railroad's policy. 

George Bartlett proposed a 
special alarm system which 
would allow local businesses to 
tie directly into a control 
board at the police station. 
There would be an initial 
installation charge and a 
monthly service fee. The 
suggestion was turned over to 
the village attorney for study. 

The first reading of the 
annual appropriation was 
presented to the board. After 
the report has been studied and 
revised v by each village 
department the second reading 
and approval of the $638,850 
budget will be acted upon. 





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Now you can enjoy all the convenience and 
prestige of a State Bank of Antioch Personal 
Checking Account at no cost to you . . . Write 
all the checks you want, make all the deposits 
you want ... There are no service charges if 
you maintain a minimum balance of SI 50 
during the month. If your Balance falls betow 
the $150 minimum the service charge is $1.50 
plus 5c per check. 



We furnish without cost the initial order of 50 
checks; these bear your name and are consecu- 
tively numbered; plus your name gold stamped 
on an attractive and durable check cover. Mind 
you, these are furnished without cost or 
obligation. 








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SERVICE 
BANK , 



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THE ANTIOCH NEWS 



* ■ «• 




\VED., JULY ^14, 1971 

•*«i A *■ i t' ■"" ■'"*.' '■"■"' > w-'«M *s' - -a 

V » . ■■,...'.''*■"' V 



:Tfii ? m YJHJi f .a'aw 

Page 8 




*^-»- v-< 




by 

Karen Sheehan 



Just happened' to be out at 
Ravenswood YMCA camp to 
visit some friends that I go to 
school with at Cornell College 
that are working there for the 
summer, when I was 
"introduced" to KAREN 
SCHLEUSENER who's 
working there too. What ■■ do 
they say about a small world? 
If the kids at camp don't tire 
her out too much, Karen wilt 
be going back to St. Olaf 
College in Minnesota as a 
sophomore in Nursing. 

Also able to band-aid a knee 
out at the YMCA is CYNDIE 
SCHLEUSENER, Karen's older 
sister. Cyndie is getting her 
nursing degree at Illinois 
Wesley a n>?in^ JBloomington 
where shje'll Be a ju n ior tli is 
fall. 

CAR 
doesn'i 
Antioi 
finish] 
in threi 
carries' 
Univei 
Circle 

return tb Michigan State in 
September. Next spring Carol 
will grndiLa4je fwith a 
psychologwmalorland continue 
on to gradiat Ji sdhodl. Whew! 

After a \twclwcak\ vacation 
at home DIANR \\JENSSEN 
recently renrngd- tduUtheran 
General Hdsnita^Sonool of 
Nursing in Moline. Diane has 
finished one year and has 
another year until she 
graduates and becomes a 
Registered Nurse in June. Since 
the only vacation • Diane has 




SO-d'E-TY 




UND 

rck to 

busy 

State 

Right wM Carol 

lours \ajf the 

Illinois Chicago 

and th en she'll 



left is one week at Christmas, 
she doesn't get' home very 
often either. 

Presently working for 
Da Igaar d V Certified Super 
Market, JIM DALGAARD will 
leave for two years active duty 
in the' Navy in November. This 
spring Jim received his 
associate degree in Business 
Ad ministration and 
Management at North wood 
Institute. Jim will either enter 
"A" School at Great Lakes or 
he may go right out to sea. 



r 1 

fc3 TV 



1 



SAVE OUR STUDENTS: 
The Antioch News offers its 

1 services to any employer with 
■ an available job. Just phone ... 

2 395-5554 and we will find an ( 
I anxious and willirr 
I fill your job needs. 



! 



anxious and willing student to | 





by Del Jahneke 



A Sunday July 4th picnic 
cook-out was held at the JOhn 
Handschiegel home, Grass Lake 
Road, Antioch, for some fifty 
friends and their families. 
Plenty of good food, fun and 
frolic for young and old alike 
were enjoyed by one arid all! 

The senior Ed Jahnekes, 
Beach Grove, had the sorrow 
of seeing a loved One laid to 
rest on July 8th at the 
LaGrange Cemetery. Mrs. 
William Gauger of LaGrange, 
Mrs. Jahneke's aunt was 87 
years old, and had been an 
invalid for the~past four years. 
However it was mingled joy 
arid sadness as they saw family 
members and friends they 
hadn't seen for many years. 

The Bernard DeVries 
family, North Avenue, 
Antioch,' spent the July 4th 
weekend at Sparta Wisconsin' 
seeing Berriie's parents the sam 
DeVries. They also visited with 
the Tom DeVries at La Crosse. 
Barbara and Kathy DeVries,. 
daughters of Tom, 
accompanied the Antioch 
DeVries back here for a little 
vacation, 

A big family-style picnic 
was held Sunday, July 11 at 
the Elmer Justin farm in 
McHenry for the Model A Car 
Club members. Some 31 
families in Antioch own Model 
A's with one family having the 
distinction of two Model A's in 
their midst, the John W. 
Horans, 499 Orchard St. and 
their Son John A. Horan now 
residing in Gurnee. 



Lindholm and Stroner unite in matrimony. 




On June 5 at Redeemer 
Lutheran Church, Reverend 
Loren Trapp united Diana 
Lindholm and Richard Stroner 
in Holy Matrimony. 

Parents of the couple are 
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Lindholm, 
3116 3 Miles Road, Racine 
Wisconsin, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Stroner, Antioch. 

The bride's gown of white 
organza was reminiscent of the 
turn of the century and was 
accented with imported Swiss 
braid. A Chanel bow held a 



sweeping mantilla train which 
was edged with braid also. 

Vick i Sherman of 
Milwaukee was the maid of 
honor. She was attired m a 
candy apple green gown. 

Bruce Knutsen of Antioch 
was the best man. 

A reception was held at 
Racine Motor Inn. 

The couple will reside in 
Lewiston, Montana where Mr. 
Stroner is stationed with the 
United States Air Force. 



"I souped It up-" 



n.; PL-TIES. <L. locletas fr. 
socius a ' companion; - cf. F. 
■ocietc. See SOCIAL) the 
relationship of men associated 
in any way to one another; 
companionship; fellowship; 
connection; participation.' 



Day of Renewal 
at Abbey 



■ . On Sunday, August 1 
there will be a Charismatic 
Day of Renewal* Ecumenical 
at St. Benedict's Abbey just 
. north of Antioch. (North 
Ave. east past the Bargain 
Bam to Nelson Road, left 1 
mile to the Abbey. Turn 
right. Register at the large 
quonset building (gym). 

Activities for the day will 
include: 

12:30 - Sharing Session-Chris- 
tians sharing how they have 
experienced God in a truly 
living, special way. 
2: 30 p,m. ^ Main address by 
Father McNutt of St. Louis, 
Mo. Topic: "Healing of 
Memories" n> 

4:30 p.m. - Liturgy 
6:00 p.m. - Pot Luck Supper 
During the supper hour 
there will be a prayer room for 
those who request prayers for 
their spiritual and physical 
problems. 



MRS. SUNDIN 
RECEIVES AWARDS 



Mrs. Edward Sundin, Route 
4, Antioch received a Superior 
Achievement Award for $560 
from Captain R. A. Jones, SC, 
USN, Commanding Officer of 
the Navy Electronics Supply 
Office, Great Lakes, where she 
is a supply, clerk in the Stock 
Control Division. She 
investigated the use of excess 
electronic parts in the ESO 
repair program for Fiscal Years 
1971, 1972, and 1973 and 
saved the Navy $10,410. 

Mrs. Sundin was also 
awarded $55 for a benefrcial 
suggestion which will improve 
Uniform Inventory Control' 
Point Manual Repair Schedule 
forms. 



Most kids nowadays think 
a well balanced meal is a ham- 
burger in each hand. — 



Farmer's Pieiiic 

Plans Complete 

■ ; ','■ • i. ■ ', ; ■■'■■ . jt 

* ' - . \ - *■* a. ' ". ■ ' f ' . , 

Planning and. organization 
for the Annual Lion's Club 
Farmer's Picnic and Chicken 
Bar-B-Q, Sunday, August 1, are 
complete, announced Art Mei- 
erdirk, chairman of the act- 
ivity. 

Charcoal broiled. and butter 
basted . Chicken Bar-B-Q, pre- 
pared by experienced. Lion's 
Club cooks, "will be served star- 
ting at 11:00 am., followed 
immediately by a full after- 
noon of events and activities 
for the entire family. 

The Farmer's auction, 
starting at 2:00 p.m., will be 
the climax of the afternoon 
when valuable merchandise will 
be sold to the highest bidder 
- by Auctioneer Herman Behm. 
Other scheduled events are: 

11:00 a.m. - Invitational 
swim Meet 

1:15 p.m. - Children's Egg 
Catching and Sack races 

2:15 p.m. - Children's 
Chicken catching & money in 
the hay 
jj:15 p.m. -. Children's 



wheelbarrow relay & leapfrog 
relay 

4:15 p.m. - Children's bal- 
loon throwing & 3 legged races 

The Antioch Lion's Club 
1971 Bar-B-Q promises to be 
the best ever. Plan to bring the 
entire family for a complete 
dinner at $1.75 per plate, and 
remain for the afternoon of 
fun and activity, 




HOSPITALITY, WARM 
GREETINGS, AND A 
WIDE VARIETY OF 
HELPFUL CIVIC 
INFORMATION: 



ifefflSK^i 



If you are new in town 
rail 395-240fi 



Visit Our I 





<• Lconians, have long been 
lionized as proud, regal and 
strong-willed. They arc also 
commanding,* powerful, gener- 
ous, reliable, fixed in opinions 
and principles, good leaders 
and ; good creators both , of 
family and ideas for orgariizav 
Lion. Faithful and trusting. 



they are usually cheerful, and 
their favorite pastimes include 
games and the theatre. 

These traits, however, if 
overstressed, can lead, to insist- 
a nee on being "number one," 
refusal to be content with 
second place, and a desire to 
maintain leadership and make 
I no changes. Excessive empha- 
sis, on power may develop. 

Their flower is the orange 
gladiola, their stone' the ruby,, 
and domineering ^ways- thejr 
main trait. 






and select a fine perfume or cologne fragrance 



PRINCE MATCHABELLl 



_N 






OH */«^— CHANE L 

HOUBIGANT - ■ u 

choose an C^^miemif^teet^d 
card from our fine selection 






3TJL 

Antioch Shopping Plaza 
480 Orchard 




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\ •.■^jEtf^su.^.^;^. .. . 



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THE ANTIOCH NEWS 




1 WED., JULY 14, 1971 



Page 9 




the 
Way with 





Congratulations Babe Ruth 
District Champs! Great Day!! 
This is the first time a Babe 
Ruth Team has won a District , 
Tournament, and they have a 
beautiful trophy to prove it. \ 
On to the ftegionals at our own 
high school field at 2 p.m. on 
Saturday. Good: Luck, boys. 

Here tell the style show held: 
at the Antioch' Country Club 
was a huge success. . .Our hats 
go off to the Am way 
distributors of Wisconsin and 
Illinois who graciously covered 
all expenses for the Ecology 
Club benefit. The Godey Girls 
and the Sewer did a swell job. 
■ All proceeds go to the Ecology 
Club of ACHS 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY 
to. . . Michell Scanlon of 
Salem, Julie Gutowski and 
OUR MAYOR RAY TOFT, 
who^wiU IJie celebrating his on 
July 19... '~~ ~ 

Get Well wishes .are 
extended to Mr. S. Bailey of 
Milburn (his daughter is Marge 
Solar of Antioch). Another 
daughter, Mrs. Fred Ditlenburg 
is visiting here from Hemit, 
California to wish him a speedy 
recovery.... 

Former Antioch residents 
DICK AND MARGE RIPLEY 
and their two daughters of 
Portland, Oregon stopped to 
see many of their old friends 
here while on the way to Ohio 
where they will stay with their 
families. .. Good to see you 
back, Doc! 

More former residents, 
DONNA AND DALE JONES 
and family (self-appointed 
mayor of the big town 



population 325, of. Haynes, 

Arkansas) were in town visiting 

many, former classmates. Guess 

when you live, "down South** 

for a few years, you do acquire 

a drawl 

Good weather, 'delicious 

prime rib, music, and fun 

people. Put them all together 

and you have the Annual Lions 

Club Swim party. Heard there 

was. a stripper (?) who 

entertained along with all the 

unexpected swimmers!! 

THOSE WHO GOT THROWN 

IN!!! 

Hear tell the LADIES 

MORNING GOLF LEAGUE is 

doing great. With a little more 

practice, some of these ladies 

will be; able to beat their 

husbands at the game. . . 

Happy 35th Anniversary, 

July 14 to JACK AND ROSE 

SEBESTA. . . 

The EARL PAPE FAMILY 

recently returned from a trip 

out west. Points of interest 

.were the Black Hills, 

Yellowstone, and a rodeo in 

Cheyenne, Wyoming.- 

. . Bernice reports the 

mountains are sure beautiful. 

Bet whe wishes the snow was 

on them, so she could do a 

little skiing!!! 

Don't forget the ANTIOCH 

LITTLE LEAGUE PANCAKE 

BREAKFAST Saturday at the 

Methodist Church. Serving 

starts at 7 a.m. Here tell some 

; of those coaches fry some 

pretty good pancakes. See ya 

there. . . 

For lots of fun, see you at 

trie AFS FESTIVAL OF 

COMEDY tonite, . . <; 

Annie Mae 



■#»»»»»## # # # #<############»#####< 




Deductions 



■####### »#### # ######## » » » ##»##» # 



This week saw the addition 
of two new female citizens for 
Antioch. A first child, a 
daughter, was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. James Glenn on Sunday, 
July 11. Elizabeth Ann arrived 
at Victory Memorial Hospital 
weighing in at 6V& lbs. 
■ Grandparents, all from 
Antioch, are Mrs. Sylvia 
Erbach and Mr. and Mrs. E.H. 
Glenn. 



Gigi and Jim Spittle are the 
proud parents of a baby 
daughter. Their little pink 
bundle weighed hi at 9 lbs. 9 
oz. and measured. 21 inches 
long when' she arrived at 
Victory Memorial Hospital at 9 
a. m. on July 12. 

Stacey Lee*s grandparents 
are Mr. and Mrs. George 
Palaske of Antioch and Mr. and 
Mrs. Howard Spittle of 
Lindenhurst. 



Macrame is like magic in 
the surprising effects it gives. 
But, of course, it isn't really 
magic. Anyone who can tie a 
lcnot can do it because ma- 
crame is the art of tying knots. 
Many knots are tied to form 
patterns or ' designs in the 
string or cord. When the whole 
piece is done, it can be used 
as a belt or headband. Many 
knotted pieces can be put to- 
gether to form wall and win- 
dow hangings, other useful 
decorations and fashion acces- 
sories. 

String or cord is used for 
macrame. They are 'available 
most often only in white, so 
for color variety, dye them. 
Mix 1 package powder or % 
cup liquid Rit dye into 1 quart 
very hot tap water. Add string 
or cord all at once or make a 
skein and rotate in dye. When 
a ' shade darker than desired 
color is reached, remove and 
rinse thoroughly then ^dry. 
(Colors appear lighter when 
dry.) 

For a first macrame project,' 
follow these directions for a 
unique but easy belt. The. pat- 
tern is made from a series of 



CREATIVE CRAFT 



Macrame Magic 



\ 



square knots. Begin with two 
lengths of dyed string or cord 
cut 6 times the waist measure- 
ment. Place both \ cords to- 
gether, ends even, and secure 
.both at center with a tack or 
heavy weight. Separate the 
cords; there will be four. 
Number them 1,2,3 and 4 
starting from the left. 

In the first step to the 
square knot, 4 bring cord 1 
straight across over the cords 
2 and 3 and under cord 4. 

Next. bring cord 4 under cords 
2 and 3, then pull over cord 
4 up and through loop formed 
between cords 1 and 2. Now 
repeat this step but starting 
with cord 1,: now on the far 
right. This will form a square 
knot. Pull outer cords tight 
to finish knots. The two center' 
cords (2 and 3) will remain 
in the center for the whole 
belt length. 




Make the first square knot 
about 2% inches from the se- 
cured center point. Continue 
making these square' knots, 
about V/> inches apart, until it 
measures desired waist size. 
Finish with a double square 
knot. Cut cord ends to even 
lengths. Slip ends through be- 
ginning loop to close belt. Tie 
a knot at the end of each cord 
to prevent fraying. To make 
knots extra tight, thoroughly 
wet the belt, then allow to dry ' 
on a flat surface. Knots will 
tighten as it dries. 




i 





Summer 



Sale 



30 % off 

ON ALL SUMMER SPORTSWEAR 

SALE STARTS THURS. JULY 15th 



ALL SALES FINAL 



a 



Swimming Suits — Swim Caps— Beach Cover 
Ups — Sunglasses — Shorts — Bermuda's — 
Shifts — Knit Tops — Sleevless Blouses — 
Slacks — Skirts — Dresses — Summer 
Footwear — Jewelry — Pat Suits — Pant 
Dresses -r Pant Skirts — Stockings — Panty 
Hose — Rain'n Shine Coats — Jackets 



In The Shopping Plaza 

GIBBS AND JENSSEN 

Carousel' 



**i 



}** 



SHOPPING PLAZA 



395-2244 





V 



& 



c 






,■ 




VI 











CHURCH 
SERVICES 



St Stephen Lutheran Church 

Rev. Phillip Laurin, Pastor 
Hillside and Rte. 59 
395-3359 . 

Sunday Worship 9:30. a.m. 
Church School 10:45 a.m. 

/.. .- 

St. Ignatius Episcopal Church 

Rev. T. A. Bessette, Rector 

983 Main St. 

395-0652 

Sunday 8 am., 9:30 a. m. ' 

First Church of Christ, 
.'.'•■. Scientist 

Rte. 173 and Harden . 
395-1196 

Sunday 11 a.m. 
Sunday School 11 a.m. 
Wed. five. 8 p.m. 

Antioch Evangelical Free 
Church 

Bernard C. Fosmark, Pastor 
Tiffany Rd. and Highway Dr. 
395-4117 

Sunday School 9:45 a.m. 
Sunday Services 11 a.m., 7 p.m. 
Thurs. Eve. 7:30 p.m. 



Millbum Congregational United 
Church of Christ 

Rev. Lauren Messcrsmith 
356-5237 

Sunday Service 10 a.m. 

Faith Evangelical Lutheran 
. Church 

Rev. Donald M. Ponath, Pastor 

Rt. 21, Antioch 

395-1660 

' Sunday Services 8, 10:30 am. 
Sunday School 9:15 am. 

St Peter's Roman Cath. Church 

Rev. Alfred Henderson 
557 Lake St. 
395-0274 ., 

Masses: Sat 5:30, 7:30 p.m. 
Sun. 6:30,8,9:30,10:45,12. 

Antioch United Methodist 
Church 

Rev. Donald Cobb, Minister 
848 Main St. . 
395-1259 ; 

Sunday Service 9:30 am. 
Sunday School 9:30 am. 



Christian Science 
Churches 

Why the works as well as 
the words of Christ Jesus can 
mean so much to people will 
he brought out at Christian 
Science church services Sunday 
in a lesson-Sermon entitled 
"Life." ' 

The healing of the 
nobleman's son will • be 
included in the Bible readings. 
The account concludes with 
these words: "So the father 
knew that it was at the same 
hour, in which Jesus said unto 
him, Thy son liveth: and 
himself believed, and his whole 
house." 

One of the citations from 
SCIENCE AND HEALTH 
WITH KEY TO THE 
SCRIPTURES by Mary Baker 
Eddy states: "Jesus established 
what he said by demonstration, 
thus making his acts of higher 
importance than his words. He 
proved what he taught." 

Services begin at 11 a.m. at 
First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, Beacon Hill, Rte. 173 
and Harden, Antioch. All are 
welcome. 



Republican Men, 
Women Busy 



4 




The Antioch Township 
Republican Club will hold its 
monthly meeting on 
Wednesday, July ?1 at Paty's 
Lounge at 8 p.m. 

On the agenda will be the 
golf outing and Award's Night 
Dinner to be held Sept. 29 at 
the Antioch Country Club. 
: , The Women's Auxiliary will 
finalize plans for the picnic for 
the wounded veterans of the 
Vietnam ■ war to be held at the 
Arbor Restaurant on August 4. 



i/\ 



The music of THE 
FANTASTICKS to be 
presented by PM&L July 23, 
24, 29, 30, 31 at the PM&L 
Theatre, 877 Main St , Antioch 
runs thegamut of expression. It 
will leave audiences with tunes 
they'll be humming or 
whistling and can't get out of 
their heads. 

The wistful "Try to 
Remember" sung by El Gallo 
(Lloyd- Pedersen), and the 
melodic "Soon . It's .Gonna 
Rain" done by Matt and Luisa 
(Jim O'Connor and Dina 
Fabry) are two of the best 
known songs from the show. 
"Never Say No" and "Plant a 
Radish" sung by the two 
fathers (Al Ramsay and Tom 
Hausman) are complete with 
humor and wit and a little soft 
shoe put in for good measure. 
"It depends on What You Pay" 
and the "Rape Ballet" are full 
of action and. rampageous 
tempo. 




^^^f^r^wfPi^^tel^^l 



^JBftg! 



A "Fantastick" show 



The pit combo playing all 
the delightful music written by 
Tim Jones and Harvey Schmidt 
is a very young group of 
accomplished musicians. 

The two pianos are played 
by Tracey Teltz from Lake 
Villa and Becky Montooth 
from Antioch. Tracey will be a 
junior at ACHS this year, 
played for the "Wizard of Oz" 
and is pianist for one of the 
high school lab bands. Becky 



the Antioch grade school and a 
graduate of North Central 
College where she began as a 
music major but switched to 

PE. 

John Caldweel from Duck 
Lake, Ingleside plays flute. He 
will be a junior at Grant High 
School and active in all band 
activities. ' . < 

, Nick Baldassano from Lake 
Villa plays drums. He has 
played with numerous combos, 
but this is his first time in a 
musical. . 

Behind the entire show is a 
very active technical crew that 
is essential for any theatrical 
production! 

The set was designed by 
director Ken Smouse. 
Production manager and stage 
manager is Nancy Eberman. 
Nancy Pettera is assistant stage 
manager. Business manager is 
Dr. Al Bucar. 

Public relations and 
publicity are being handled by 
Fred Holbert, Betty Smouse, 



crew is Kenn 

Waters, John Stringer, and 

Gerry Pettera at the. helm as 

chief rigger. House manager Is 

Gloria Holbert Ricky Apostal 

is in charge of ticket 

reservations. 

In the very important role 
of choreographer is Suzi Burns 
who began with PM&L this 
year. She played the lead in 
"Barefoot in the Park", acted 
In a one act play, did the 
choreography for the "Wizard 
of Oz" at ACHS, has done 
choreography for the Zion 
Pacemakers, and has a dancing 
school of her own in Fox Lake, 
her home. 

Tickets for THE 
FANTASTICKS can be 
purchased at the State Bank of 
Antioch, The First National 
Bank of Antioch, at the PM&L 
Theatre Box Office on July 
19,20, 21, and 22 from 7 - 9 
p.m. or by calling reservations 
to 395-9702 \ . Adult and 
student tickets are available. 



f 00 00 99090§9 ^9 9909^^ 9^ 9 90^ 9000 9 l 90M0 99 99 00 9000 4 90999990999 9 99099 l M^90^ 90 900 0^ 9 ^ 



Bring the family 




Fur For Everyone 



ANTIOCH LIONS Club 

ANNUAL .... 

Farmer's Picnic 

Chicken Bar - 

CHARCOAL BROILED 

& BUTTER BASTED] 






' ¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥^¥ 



¥¥¥¥¥***¥* 



Aug. 1 



* 11:00 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. * 



Antioch Aq 




^DONATION $1.75 PER PLATE " *RAIN DATE - AUG. 8th 

Tickets can be purchased from Antioch Lions Club members, State Bank of Antioch, 
First National Bank of Antioch, and Antioch Savings & Lpan, or on premises. 



SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 

11:00 A.M. Invitational Swim Meet, Antioch Swim Club, 
Fox Point (Bar ring ton), Kenosha AAU Club, Kenosha Town 
Club, Zion Recreation Team. 

2:00 P.M. till ? Farmer's AUCTION. 



J 



1(15 P.M. to 2:00 P.M. Children's Egg Catching & Sack 
Races. 

2:15 P.M. to 3:00 P.M. Children's Chicken Catching and 
Money in the Hay. 

3:15 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. Children's Wheelbarrow Relay and 
Leapfrog Relay* 

4:15 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. Children'* BaUoon Throwing and 3 
Legged Races. 





W 



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this on your calendar 



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MRS. JOSEPHINE 
JANOS—78 yrs old of Ant- 
ioch passed away Friday July 
9th, at the Waukegan Pavillion 
Nursing Home after an ex- 
tended illness. She was born 
Dec. 8, 1892 in Bohemia and 
came to the United States as a 
child to reside in Chicago, For- 
est Park, III. before making her 
residence in Antioch with her 
only survivors Joseph 
Borovicka. She married Frank 
Janos in 1907 in Chicago and 
he preceeded her in death on 
pec. 19, 1953. 1 brother James 
Borovicka and 2 sisters Mrs 
Ann Valha, Mrs Minnie Taylor, 
and Mrs Marie Rehpr also pre- 
ceeded her in death. 

Funeral services were held 
at 10:00 a.m. Monday at the 
Strang Funeral Home in Ant- 
ioch. Rev. Donald Cobb of the 
Antioch Methodist Church of- 
ficiated. Interment was in 
Bohemian National Cemetery 
in Chicago. — .—'■_. . 



Funeral Home at 2929 W. 87th 
St. .in Evergreen Park, III. Fun- 
eral services will be held Wed. 
July 14th with interment in 
Holy Sepulchre . Cemetery. 
Local arrangements were made 
by the Strang Funeral Home in 
Antioch. 



MR. MICHAEL J. 
BRADY— 28 *yrs old of 4626 
West 83rd Street-Chicago, III 
passed away on Sunday July 
11th from drowning at Timber 
Lake Park near Antioch. He 
was born in Chicago on Nov. 
18, 1942 and had resided there 
all of his life. He had worked 
for the City of Chicago as a 
policeman. He is survived by 
his wife Madonna (nee Mur- 
phy) Brady, Several children 
and his parents Peter J. &Jane 
Brady who \ are the owners & 
operators of the Brady Gill 



MR .ALBERT R. 
MOORE — 82 yrs old of 
Fetters Subd. ne^ Antioch,. Ill 
" passed away suddenly on Sat- 
urday July 10th at his. home. 
He was bom in Haigler, Neb- 
raska and had resided, in Chi- 
cago, until moving to Antioch 
24 yrs ago. He had been active 
in the Northern III Conser- 
vation Club, and several other 
organizations since moving to 
Antioch. He had been em- 
ployed as a supervising Ele- 
ctrician while living in Chicago. 
He is survived by a daughter 
Mrs L. W. Strandquist of Chi- 
cago and several other relatives. 
There are to be no local funeral 
services held for Mr. Moore- 
Arrangements were made by 
Strang Funeral Home of Ant- 
ioch. "■■. ' - : 

MR. LaMONT D. RAY— 72 
yrs. old of Newport Twsp. 
passed away Sunday July 11th. . 
at his home suddenly from a 
heart attack. He was born in 
Newport Twsp. and resided 
there all but 4 yrs of his life 
which was spent in Oklahoma. 
He is a member of the Millburn 
Congregational Church, and 
the Lake County Farm Bureau. 
He had been a farmer all of his 
life and worked as a main- 
tainence man for the III. Toll 
Road from 1 959 to 1969. He 





30 sq.yds 



rpet 



installed with 
sponge 




64 oz. 





COMPLETE 
+ TAX 



married Frieda Knox on March 
16, 1929 in Waukegan. 

Survivors are his wife 
Frieda-2 daughters Mrs El- 
frieda Russ (Lake Villa)-Mrs 
Irene (Earl) Nahmens (Dou- 
smah, Wis)-3 sons John &Paul 
Ray (both of Wadsworth)- 
Arthur Ray (Antioch)-l bro- 
ther Ivan Ray (Zion)~3 sisters 
Mrs Bessie Mulder (Racine, 
Wis)- Mrs Harriet Freeman 
(Waukegan)-Mrs Julia (Holm) 
Neal (North -Chicago)-20 
grandchildren. 

Funeral services were held 
at 1:30 p.m. on Tues. at the 
Strang Funeral. Home in Ant-' 
ioch. Rev. Donald Cobb of the 
Antioch Methodist Church of- 
ficiated. Interment was in Mill- 
burn cemetery. Memorials may 
be made to the Millburn Con- 
gregational church; 

MR. JESS W. SOBEY - 53 
year* old of Depot Street, 
Antioch passed away 
Wednesday, July 7 at 
Presbyterian St. Lukes Hospital 
in Chicago. He was born March 
23, 1918 in Highland Park, III. 
then moved to Antioch for 10 
years and to Libertyville for 15 
years. He then moved back to 
Antioch one month ago. 

Mr. Sobey had formerly 
been general, manager for 
Bernard Chevrolet & 
Oldsmobile garage at 
Libertyville. He was preceeded 
in death by his father John C. 
Sobey Sr. in August 1952. 

Survivors are his wife 
Myrtle, four sons Jessie J. 
Sobey of Gages Lake, John W. 
Sobey of Libertyville, Patrick 
J. Sobey of Antioch, James R. 
GrootVeld of SanBernardinq, 



MANY 




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WED.; JULY 14, 1971 





GOD 

AND THE 

* ■ 

DRUG SCENE 

Listen this Sunday to the Chris- 
tian Science Radio Series for 
some interesting insights on 
this question. 



5:00 a.m. 
6:45 o.fti. 
7:00 a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 
10:30 a.m. 



WiS 

WEMP-Wh. 

WJJD-AM 

WAIT 

WJJD-FM 



THE 



TRUTH 



THAT 
HEALS 



California and three daughters 
Judith Ann Hess of Kenosha, 
Wise, Jo Ann Brand of 
Kenosha and Dian Moreno of 
SanBernardino, . California. 
Survivors also include his 
mother Mrs. Ruth E. 
Harrington of Santa Paula, 
California, one brother John C. 
Sobey of Antioch, four sisters 
Bette White of Chicago, Laurel 
J. Morelli of Lake Forest 
Marilyn J. Leonard of Dallas, 
Texas and Eleanor M. Vlahovic 
of Palatine and .10 
grandchildren. 

Funeral services were held 
at I p.m. Saturday at the Strang 
Funeral Home in Antioch. Rev, 
Donald Cobb of the Antioch 
Methodist Church officiated. 
Interment was in North Shore 
Garden of Memories Cemetary. 



For your car 

your 

your 

your health 
your boat 

your furniture 

your business 
your jewelry 

your wardrobe 
your golf clubs 
your camera • 
yourwatdi ' 

your credit caidi 
yoaripjrtment building- 




as- 



State Farm is all you need to 
know about insurance. Give 
me a call. 



DICK 
WITT 




408 Lake 
Antioch 

395-1089 



State Farm 
is ail you need 
to. know about 
insurance. 



STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES 
HOME OFFICES: BLO0MINGT0N, ILLINOIS 








-ft 



A C R 1 1 A N 



acrylic fiber by 

Monsanto 






HEAVY LONG WEARING 

100% ACRILAN CARPETING. 

DELICATELY SCULPTURED 
PILE. 

14 COLORS TO CHOOSE 
PROM. 

GUARANTEED INSTALLATION 
FAST DELIVERY 
FREE ESTIMATE 




395-5500 



MON. thruTHURS. 9:00-5:30 
F &. 9:00-9:00; 

SAT. 9:00-5:00 




■939_iJain Street 



Antioch 



it^w ii'imin" 






■ 



... . ■ 







Call ^476 ^ Charter No. lz87a National Bank Region No, 7 

REPORT OF CONDITION, CONSOLIDATING 
DOMESTIC SUBSIDIARIES, OF THE 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
OF AISTTOGH 

In the State of Illinois, at the close of business on June 30, 1971. 
Published in response to call made by Comptroller of the 
Currency, under Title 12, United States Code, Section 161. 

Assets 

CASH and due from banks (including $ none 

unposted debits) .......... ... ... ^r. 

;UiS. Treasury Securities. . . 

OBLIGATIONS of other U. S. Government • 

agencies and corporations 

OBLIGATIONS of States and political sub- 

OTHER securities (including $84,351.25 
corporate stock),. ". . . . .... ....... ....;..... 

TRADING account securities .... . . . . . . 

FEDERAL funds sold and securities purchased 

under agreements to resell 

LOANS . .'. 

BANK premises, furniture and fixtures, and 
other assets -representing bank premises ...... 

REAL estate owned other than bank premises . 
INVESTMENTS in subsidiaries not con- 
solidated 

CUSTOMERS' liability to this bank on ac- 
ceptances outstanding 

OTHER assets (including $none direct lease 

financing) ; 

TOTAL ASSETS 




|p^! " '''.'", .' j .; . ■ ■ ■■■■■■• -■ ■ ■■ - . ■. __,;;,- t i ___^ 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS 



WED. # JULY 14, 1971 



?age 13 



$1,595,081.74 
4,309,399.68 

NONE 

1,256,156.20 

102,251.25 
NONE 

100,000.00. ... 
6,619,525.12 

181,920.70 
• 201,524.99 

NONE 

NONE 

115,829.62 
$14,481,689.30 




CUB SCOUT PACK 192 

Pack 192 started it's 
summertime activity program 
by participating in the annual 
'Memorial Day Parade. The 
proud bearers of the 
flags-Jerome Kennedy and 
Bobby Kelley, were ably 
accompanied by Richard Beck- 
er, Dan Whitney, John Freese, 
David Berchtold, Tim Havi- 
land. Shawn Lprenz, Mike 



in •-■•. • 



8,755,172.12 
124,029.10 

1,284,763.94 

NONE 

NONE 

182,962.46 



LIABILITIES 

DEMAND deposits of individuals, partner- 
ships, and corporations . . '. . . ... . . . . . . . . $ 2,945,605.25 

TIME and savings deposits of individuals, 

partnerships, and corporations . . ". 

DEPOSITS of United States Government 
DEPOSITS of States and political 
subdivisions ....... ....... ........ 

DEPOSITS of foreign governments and 

official institutions . . . ~A 

DEPOSITS of commercial banks . . . 
CERTIFIED and officers' checks, etc. 
TOTAL DEPOSITS ..... . . . $13,292,532.87 

(a) Total demand deposits . . . . $3,855,805.49 

(b) Total time and savings 
deposits ............. V*. $9,436,727.38 

FEDERAL funds purchased and securities 
sold under agreements to repurchase ..... ... 

LIABILITIES for borrowed money ...... . . . 

MORTGAGE indebtedness .tf. ...... . . . . . . 

account of this bank and outstanding . . ...... 

OTHER liabilities .... . .'. '. '. '■". ;';. '. ...;... . . . 

TOTAL LIABILITIEJ5 . ; . . . . . . v. . ; ... 

MINORITY INTEREST IN CONSOLIDATED 
SUBSIDIARIES . . 



NONE 
NONE 
NONE 

NONE 

283,028.97 

13,575,561.84 



• •* • *-'• 



. * # • ' * •'••• * 



NONE 



. \jftESERVES ON LOANS AND SECURITIES 

RESERVE for bad debt losses on loans 

(set up pursuant to IRS rulings) . . .... ...... 

OTHER reserves on loans 

RESERVES on securities .... ......... , 

TOTAL RESERVES ON LOANS 

AND SECURITIES ............••■....••• 

. CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

CAPITAL notes and debentures s 

None % Due 
EQUITY capital-total ; . . 

Preferred stock-total par value 

No. shares outstanding hone 

Common Stock-total par value ... — . 

tio. shares authorized 14.400 
No. Shares outstanding 14,400 

. * * 

Undivided profits . . . . .\ . . '. 

Reserve for contingencies and 

other capital reserves 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES, AND 
CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 



$ 120,053.36 
NONE 
NONE 

120,053.36 



NONE 

786,074.10 
NONE 

180,000.00 



400,000.00 
206,074.10 

NONE 
786,074.10 

$14,481,689.30 



MEMORANDA 

Average of total deposits for the 15 

calendar days ending with call date 

Average of total loans for the 15 
calendar days ending with call date ...... 

INTEREST collected not earned on 
installment loans included in total 
capital accounts 



* ■ • • * 



924,458.12 
6,585,725.77 



NONE 



I, Walter Daniels, Vice President & Cashier, of the above-named 
bank do hereby declare that this report of condition is true and 
correct to the best of my knowledgeand belief., 

' (signed) Walter Daniels 

We, the undersigned directors attest the correctness of this 
report of condition and declare that it has been examined by us 
and to the best of our knowledge and belief is true and correct. 

(signed) LaVerheM. Woods, 
k R. E. Barnstable, W. C. .Petty 

Directors. 





Ruggles, Ken Golonka, Scott 
Kirby, Keven Sheppard, Mike 
Conners, Kevin Nevitt, James 
Lasco, Theodore Bessette, Dan 
Larson, Gary Becker, Ronnie 
Nauman, Robert Vhal and 
Michael O'Vrien. Assisting Den 
Leaders were Jacque Olisar, 
" Jean Larson, Doris Surrock and 
Den Leader Coach Alice Bes- 
sette. . '■■ '" ' 

On June 5, 1971 the North- 
west Illinois Council held their 
Annual Scout Show. This year 
it was held at the Lakewood 
Forest Preserve near Wau- 
conda. To finance this show, 
all the Scout Packs and Troops 
in the District sold tickets to 
the show. In the contest for 
top ticket seller in Pack 192, 
the first place award went to 
Theodore Bessette, seller of 44 
tickets, 2nd place went to 
Brett Eastman selling. 30 
tickets and third place to Mike 
Rtfggles, selling 28 tickets. 

Scout show patches were 
issued to all of the boys part- 



icipating in the show and ticket 
selling. Pack 192 received a 
first place ribbon for its booth 
at the show. . — 

On June 22, the annual Lad 
& Dad picnic was held at the 
Chain- O-Lakes State Park near 
Fox Lake. The Pack furnished 
the cold opo and charcoal, fires 
and the Lad's and Dad's brou- 
ght along their own food to 
cook. With all the trails to 
follow and games for the boys 
to play, the Fathers ended up 
doing the cooking. A baseball 
game was then played. 

The boys attending the 
cookout were Bill Atwood, 
Craig Lytle, Toni Mingerelli, 
Mike Dye, Theodore Bessette, 
David Birchtold, Kenneth 
Mortenson, Billy Paschke, Rob 
Crowell, David Dyer, Greg 
Georgeson, Mike Conners, 
David Gade and Bobby Kelley. 
The "cooks" will remain anon- 
ymous. 

A pool Party in July and the 
family Picnic in August is being 
planned. 




If your insurance company is already 
giving you a break because you have a 
good driving record— chances are we can 
give you abetter break with our new 
jEtna All-Driver Plan. 

That's because we're introducing an 
entirely new, different method of 
determining rates and providing broad 
coverage for auto insurance. And there 
are 10 ways you can now qualify for ' 
lower rates or broader coverage. 



If you have a fair driving record, but 
couldn't avoid a couple of fender-benders 
over the past few years, you're most likely 
paying a higher price for your coverage. 
With the new /Etna All-Driver concept , 
you, too, may be able to save money. And 
most important, we'll give you the best 
guarantee in'the industry on renewing 
your policy. 

So come in and see us. Or if von can't 
make it, call. Today. * ^j ] 



WM. F. BUELL, INC 




UFEK.CASUAI1Y 



390 lake St 



III 312-395-0571 



10320 Main St 
Richmond, 111 

815-678-734L_ 



3508 W. Devon 
Lincolnwood, 111 

312-676-4545 



101 N. Main St 

Crystal Lake.UI 

815-4592444 



■ 
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CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION 

OF 

STATE BANK OF ANTIOCH 

AND SUBSIDIARIES at the close of business on June 30th, 
1971; Published in response to Call of the COMMISSIONER OF 
BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES of the State of Illinois. 

ASSETS 



g*Vl 




1. Cash and due from banks (including $none 
unposted debits) . .......... ..... . . . .V; 

2. U. S. Treasury securities ,•». ....... . . , '. . . 

3. Securities' of other U.S. Government 
agencies and corporations .............. 

4. Obligations of States and political 

-. 5. Other securities (including $ none 
. corporate stocks) ..;.... . . .......... ... 

6. Trading account securities. 

7. Federal funds sold and securities 
purchased under agreements to resell 

8. Other loans (including $22,428.08 

9. Bank premises, furniture and fixtures 

and other assets representing bank premises. 
10. Real estate owned other than bank 

premises * 

11. Investments in subsidiaries not 

consolidated — 

12. Customers* liability to this bank on 

acceptances outstanding .... . . . . . ... . . . . 

i. o. vJiner .assets ......................... 

14. TOTAL ASSETS 

LIABILITIES 

15. Demand deposits of individuals, partner 
ships, and corporations .......'......... 

16. Time and savings deposits of individuals, 
partnerships/and corporations .......... 

17. Deposits of United States Government . . 

18. Deposits of States and political 
subdivisions ■'. . . 

19. Deposits of foreign governments and 
official institutions 

20. Deposits of commercial banks 

21. Certified and officers, check's, etc ~ 

22. Total Deposits ... . . $32,720,511.37 

(a) total demand deposits 

....-;••'■•..*. ......... tpo,51o,UUo.o2 

(b) total time and savings deposits .... . . 

23. Federal funds purchased and securities 
sold under agreements to. repurchase . 

24. Other liabilities for borrowed money ..... 

25. Mortgage indebtedness r 

26. Acceptances executed by or for 

account of this bank and outstanding 

- 27. Other liabilities '. 

28. TOTAL LIABILITIES 



$2,334,089.40 
3,650,617134 

1,653,000.00 

3,940,404.07 

75,500.00 
NONE 

1,000,000.00 

21,605,588.36 

524,723.11 

73,725.52. 

2,353.74 

NONE 
"289,219.26 
$35,149,220.80 



$7*220,693.20 

21,947,503.05 
117,552.20 

3,001,945.75 

NONE 

NONE 

432,817.17 



-NONE 
NONE 
NONE 

NONE 

750,414.09 
$33,470,925.46 



29. MINORITY INTEREST IN CONSOLI- 
DATED SUBSIDIARIES 



NONE 



RESERVES ON LOANS AND SECURITIES 



30. Reserve for bad debt losses on loans 
(set up pursuant to Internal Revenue • 
Service rulings) 

31. Other reserves on loans 

32. Reserves on securities 

33. TOTAL RESERVES ON LOANS AND 
SECURITIES 



CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 



34. Capital notes and debentures 

35. Equity capital, total (items 36-40) 

36. Preferred stock-total par value 

(No. shares outstanding none 

37. Common stock-total par value .......... 

(No. shares authorized 28000) 
(No. shares outstanding 28000) 
os* surplus .....•...........#.*.,...'....' 

39. Undivided profits 

40. Reserve for contingencies and other 
caoital reserves ...•....'•••••••....•<• 

41. TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS (34 & 35) . 

42. TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES, AND 
CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 



133,368.16 
NONE 
NONE 

$133,368.16 



NONE 

1,544,927.18 

NONE 

280,000.00 



1,000,000.00 
264,927.18 

NONE 
1,544,927.18 

$35,149,220.80 




LATE OBITUARY 



WM. R. BOLLAM, 52 yrs old 
of 616 Granada Blvd., 
Venetian Village- passed away 
at 9 P.M. at St. fherese 
Hospital in Waukegan. He was 
bom April 4, 1919 in Chicago 
where he lived until moving to 
Lake Villain® 956. 

He was employed as a 
musican and night club 
entertainer. He was a member 
of the Local 28 Musicians 
Union in Waukegan. 
" Survivors are Ms wife Helen; 
1 daughter Mrs Patricia (David) 
Fabry, Lindenhurst; 1 son Wm 
R. Bollam Jr. Waukegan; 1 
granddaughter. r 

Services will be held at 1:30 
Thursday July 15, at the 
Strang Juneral Home in 
Antioch. Officiating will be 
Reverand Harold R. Nelson of 
St Marks Lutheran Church of 
Lindenhurst with interment in 
Warren Cemetery. Friends may 
call after 3:00 P.M. 
Wednesday. Memorials will be 
appreciated. ™ r~ ~ ~~ ~ — ~~ 



SEQUOIT 
AUXIUARlt V.F.JV. 

Sequoit Auxiliary V.F.Wi 
met on Monday at their regular 
meeting. New officers for 1972 
filled their stations. Laura 
Swanson, poppy chairman 
reported on the poppy day sale 
held recently. Olive Hallwas 
reported on some of, the items 
she has already gotten for the 
Hobby Corner sate to be held 
in November. A discussion was 
held as to how the Auxiliary 
could celebrate its 25th 
anniversary which is this 
December. All members to 
bring their ideas to the next 
meeting. Lillian Burnette and 
Ellen Flint are to goto the 5th 
District meeting on Aug. 1st at 
Villa Park. Refreshments were 
served by the president Ellen 
Flint. 



I, Berniee Reisser, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do 
solemnly Affirm that this report of condition is true and correct, 
to the best of my knowledge and belief. &. 

(signed) B. Reisser 
* W. Brook, R. Daniel, T. Larson 

Directors 



INSULATION 

r AWNINGS 

SIDINGS 

ALUMINUM WINDOWS! 

AND DOORS 



^BURLINGTON ROOFING 
& INFLATING CORP. 

525 N. Pine St. Burlington, Wis. 53105 



Phone 4Uw763-6V13l 




STESM 

IM1B 

STEAM TRIPS 

HRILL KIDS 




iu&inlie 7 




• mil 

Pull-Sui 

MID-CONTINENT 

HAILWAY 

MUSEUM 




FARES Adults: $2.00 plus tax 

Children (thru llh $1.00 plus tax 
Children in arms: FREE 

OPERATING. Qpfnlnt-MtySO 
Diifv-MMie Juna thru trior Dm 

thru Mfddfs October 

OnfySM/iflfwortof 
BarahoogWiiconsin 

Present this ad at 
North Freedom Depot 

for 10 % discount— 
, your entire party! 









THE ANTIOP^^EWS WEIX^ JULY,, 14* ^1 Page 14 





. RATES: Up thru 15 words $1.60 - Additional words $.08 each. 



Let Antioch know what you 
have for sale. Place a Classified 
Ad in the ANTIOCH NEWS. 

V call-39 5-5554 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



If you. see yourself In the Antioch' 
News and you'd. like to have the' 
picture* come see us at 141 Chert \ 
Lane. For $1.00 It's yours. V 



flfj Aj' TTtt iwr ■■ iWI nil flgl 

SoJBLJBL w Jit* UhSb 



FURNACES CLEANED 
AND REPAIRED 

OIL BURNER SERVICE 
A.J.EGGERT 

Gamp Lake, Wisconsin . . 
Telephone 41 4-889-4631 " 



NERVOUS? Can't sleep? Try 
"sleepers". Satisfaction 
guaranteed or money back, 
only 98cts. Reeves Drugs. 

(3-4p) 



FOR SALE 



I960 Ford Fastback Mustang. 851 
engine* Excellent condition. Call 
414-877-2065. 




Horses*- 3 quarter horse mares and 
1 two-year old- colt. AU gentle. 
Phone 414-768-6778, Burlington, 

wise; 4/c . 



Reduce excess fluids with 
FLUIDEX, $1.69 - LOSE 
WEIGHT safely 
Dex-A-Diet, $.98 at 
Drugs. 



with 
Reeves 



Labrador puppies. Black, AKC 
Champion sired; Male and .female. 
First shot and wormed. Call 
812-786-8406/ 

4/c 



(3-26p) 



LEG CRAMPS? Try Supplical 
with calcium. Only $1.98 at 
Reeves Drugs. 

(3-14p) 



TO PLACE NEWS OR ADS IN 
THE ANTIOCH NEWS- 
' Call 395-5554 



LOST 

One ski in Channel Lake area on 
June 23. Return to T.J. Robinson, 
Channel Lake Shores, Antioch. 
395-1869. LIBERAL REWARD. 




Part-time woman for ad lay-out and 
paste-up. Approx. 28 hours per 
.week. Experience preferred. Call 
395-5554 for interview. 



'i t v. 



, ■ * . ■ ■ ■ • ■ '' - '. «• • V.HL r 

■.'■' 

Puppy -. Antioch area. Red nisi 

color, white on chest. Brown collar. 

REWARD. CaU 395-1671 • or 

395-3163. 

■ 4/c 



:,>--;•;/:.,. 






Woman for light housework. 1 day 
per week for elderly lady.. CaU Ivan 
Aronson. 396-0024. 

4/C 




PORTRAITS 



ADD TO HOME DECOR 



Photographic portraits, 
much in vogue as decorating 
accessories in past years, are 
now enjoying a resurgence of 
popularity in an increasingly 
individualistic society. 

Interior designers note that 
people are becoming more and 
more interested In 
individualizing their homes, 
comments Joseph Rush of B- J 
Studios. Because of our 
crowded cities, expanding 
suburbs, and mass-produced 
homes and apartments, living 
space often lacks a special 
human touch. • 



Mr. Rush explains that 

something special is provided 
by portrait arrangements In 
various rooms. A grouping of 
portraits Is really a gallery of 
visual memories that record a 
family's growth. Individual . 
portraits Introduce visitors to 
the personalities in a family 
and the Great Occasions 
they've shared, such as 
graduations, an Important 
birthday, an anniversary; or a 
wedding. 

'i The impact is subtle but 
effective. "I'm in a home not 
just a house" registers the 
subconscious Impression. 

Remember, don't let your 
"Great Occasion" slip by. Call 
today for an appointment at 
the W Studios, 395-5554, and 
make your house a home with 
beautiful \ portraits of YOUR 
% memories. 



■•: V 



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- . . 

■■■■'■ ^ ■ ■ , 

CLAIMNPTICE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LAKE 
COUNTY' ILLINOIS , 

PROBATE DIVISION 

ESTATE OP FLORENCE 
CATHARINE KELLEY, 

deceased, FILE NO. 71 P 340 
NOTICE IS GIVEN of the 
death " of FLORENCE 
CATHARINE KELLEY, of 
Antioch, Illinois. Letters of 
Office were issued on June 29, 
1071, to CLARENCE W. 
KELLEY of 10160 Lyndale 
Avenue, South Bloomington, 
Minnesota 55420 and FRANK 
RYAN, of 402; North 
Cleveland : Avenue, St. Paul, 
Mi n he so t a 5 5 10 4. 
Executors-whose resident agent 
is Edward C: Jacobs, 425 Lake 
St., Antioch, 111. and whose 
attorneys are Jacobs & Jacobs, 
425 Lake Street, Antioch, 
Illinois. 

Claims against the estate 
may be filed in the Probate 
office of the Clerk of said 
Court, 18 N. County Street, 
Waukegan, Illinois, 60085, 
within 7 months from the date 
of issuance of letters; any claim 
riot so filed is barred as to the 
estate inventoried within that 
period. Also copies of claims 
must be mailed or delivered to 
the Executors, Resident Agent 
and to the attorneys. - 

STEPHANIE SULTHIN 
Clerk of the Circuit Court 
July 7-14-21/71. 







■"■'.■ . ■ ■ , *•?•';.■'■ . ajis. 




THE ANTIOCH NlBWS 







WED.,, JULY 14, 1971 



Page 15 




ZONING NOTICE 
OF PUBLIC HEARING 
;eof Antioch, 

Illinois 



TO: WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

A public hearing will be 
held in the Village Hall, 874 
Main Street, Antioch, Illinois, 
on Tuesday, the 10th day of 
August, 1971, at 7:30 p.m. on 
the following: 

Petitioners: Lillian G. 
Ackerman, Contract Seller, and 
Raymond Toft and Joan Toft, 
his- wife, as Contract 
purchasers. 

Location and/or Address of 
Property involved: Northwest 
corner of Main Street and 
Poplar Street (unimproved 
property). 

Legal Description: Lots 19 and 
20 in William's Brothers 
Subdivision in the Village 
of Antioch, being a Subdivision 
of part of the North West 
quarter of Section — ;~ — 
8, Township 46 North, Range 
10, ' East of the 3rd p.m., 
according to the plat 
thereof, recorded May 29, 
1908, as Document 117298 in 
Book "H" of Plats, page 
5 In Lake County Illinois. .-. . ' 

Change in Classification Sought 
and Variation to be Granted: 
From R-2 One Family 
Dwelling District to R-5 
Multiple Family District and 





variation to Antioch 
Zoning Ordinance Section 
10, 6- 1 to allow townhouse or 
one family row dwellings 
(party wall type) with seven or 
more dwelling units in a 
building. 

All persons desiring to appear 
and be heard for or against said 
rezoning and granting a 
variation may appear at said 
hearing and be heard theron. 

Dated this 12th day of July, 
1971. 

Village of Antioch 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

Grant Spong, Chairman 

July 14-21-28/71 



POLICE REPORT 



The residence of Dennis 
O'Connell, - 125-Cheri~Lane, T 
Antioch was robbed on 
Saturday, July 10. 

Five young men entered the 
home at 8:30 p.m. while it was 
being watched by a babysitter. 
The robbers remained until 
10:30 p.m. 

A number of items were 
found 1 missing when, the 
O'Connells returned home. 




JPRMNTMNG 
SERVICE 

INCORPORATED 
PRINTERS SINCE 1020 





Offset - Letterpress 




■ — also — 
Art Work . ■ , ' ., 
• Fine Statlorlery & Cards 
• Weddings 
• Engravings 
• Direct Mail 
• Brochures 

Magnetic Signs 
• Matches 
• Napkins ." 





395-4111 



- -- 966-VIGTORIA ST. " 
ANTIOCH ILLINOIS 









George Washington Carver found over 100 new commercial 
uses for the sweet potato. 






Children's 
Dress & Play 



.1' l CS 



1st Quality Latest Shades 
PANTYHOSE 



3 pr* 









*.!) < ' \*». 



value 

to $8 





Women's Latest Styles 
Famous Mfgs, 



97 



97 



to 




Special Store Hours 



FAMOUS BRANDS --FANTASTIC VALUES 



Children's White Patents 




... 



:^3M>4 : S 




yt-^',t 



is -from Payless Foods" 



mrs 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

I .• 9:00 ^.m. to 9:00 p.m. 

t 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

n 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 

404 LAKE STREET ANTIOCH 







Other Men's Dress 
and Work Shoes 

97 







. ...= -■ 






- 

■ 





. .' - 

4 



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JULY 15- 



OFFICIAL CLAIMING 
STATIONS 



Best Bait & Tackle 
Route 12 South of Volo , 


7ft2*7740' 


Ruzicka's Resort 
. Pistakee Lake 


687-5653 


Happy Acres 

Route 173 U Fox River 


395-2005 


Hillings Resort 
Grass Lake 


,395-2250 


Ehmann's Hillside Resort 
Meyers Bay 


587-2222 


Channel Lake Boat House 
Channel Lake 


395-1434 


Sorenson's Bait Shop 
Routes 59 & 173 


395-9751 

i 


Rudy's Resort 
Lake Marie 


395-9785 


Haismann's Resort 
Lake Marie 


395-2036 


Tuck's Squaw Creek Resort 
Route 59 & Squaw Creek 


587-5842 


Bart's Bait Shop 
601 South Route 12 


587-0331 

* 


Wooster Lake Camping Resort 
999 East Route 134 


587-8700 



"LUCKY 



7 Weeks Of Fishing 





GRAND PRIZES 



1 JOHNSON OUTBOARD MOTOR 9H hp 

2 JOHNSON OUTBOARD MOTORS 6 bp 
4 JOHNSON OUTBOARD MOTORS 4 hp 
Period prizes will be given away for the four 
largest Grapples, Blucgills, Striped Bass, 
Channel Cat, Bass, Walleye and Northern Pike. 



Sweepstakes Prizes 



AIL entries become eligible for period 
sweepstakes prize drawing. See rules; 



Period Prizes 



Berkley Rod & Reel Combination 
Minnow-Saver Buckets 
Spinning Line Kits 
Picnic Coolers 
Assorted Lure Kits 
Piano Tackle Boxes 



all winners eligible to compete for grand 
prize drawing. September 12th. 





?» 



1. Contest to be known as **1Ci71 Chain 0' Lakes Area Fishing Derby. 

2. Types of fish to enter in contest. — Northern, Walleye, Bass. Striped 
tiasSiJBluegiUj L jCrai2)>ie_aml Channel Cat. 

3; Contest is open to anyone wishing: toentef Osh ~^^ 

the Illinois Department of Conservation Herniations in contest waters. 
Kmployees of Official Claiming Stations' and Commercial pr Profes- 
sional Fishermen a i'e not eligible. 

4. Contest waters are from the Illinois State Line on the Fox River to 
the Mc Henry Dam on the Fox Hirer; including the various lakes'. 
(Channel Lake.. Lake Catherine. Lake Marie, Bin ft' Lake, Spring Lake, 
Petite Lake, Grass Lake, Fox Hirer, Nippersink Lake, Fox Lake, 
Pistakee Lake, Simaw Creek, Long Lake and including Wooster Lake.) 

5. In case of any dispute the decision of the Contest Judges shall he 
final. 

6. All claiming stations must he members of the -Chain 0' Lakes Resort 
Owners' Association. 

7. More than one fish may he entered, but no one is eligible to win mine 
than one prize a week and one grand prize per year. 

A separate entry blank must be properly filled out for each fish en- 
tered hi the contest. Names of winners, water where tish were caught; 
bait used and pictures become the property of C.O.L.R.O.A. - This 
information is to be used for publicity purposes. All winning fish 
will he kept by' Official Claiming Satiou until official verification by, 
Contest Judges. 

NOTE: SPECIAL SWEEPSTAKKS PRIZES FOR ALL ENTRIES. 
After winning entries are chosen each week, all remaining entries 
will he put in a special locked drawing drum and 4 winners' will be 

cliosep from this group. 



8. 



0. 



1 



CONTEST DATES 
First Period: July IS Vo July 25. 
Second Period: July 26 to Aug. 
Third Period: Aug. 2 (o Aug, 8. ..:... 

Fourth Period:'. Aug. 9 to Aiig. 15 

Fifth Period: Aug. lti io Aug. 22..... 
Sixth Period: Aug. 23 to Aug. 29..... 
Seventh-Period :-^\ug. 3U to Sept. 6. 



*f~- 



- - - - - . - - ■ 



. ■.......„««..«■-■*-*- - « 



CHECK IN 

....;. J iily -2H 
.........Aug. 2 

Aug. 9 

.....Aug. Ifi 
.....Aug. 23 
...Aug. 30 
........Sept. 7 



DAY 



After Fishing You'll En|oy. . . 



Fox Lake Lions Club 
Carnival July 7-11 

Antioch Maxwell St. 
Days July 29-31 

Lake County Fair 
July 28 - August 1 

Camp Duncan Y 50th 

Anniversary-July 28- 

Aug. 1 



Antioch Lions Club 
Chicken Barbecue Aug. 1 

Kenosha County Fair, 
Wilmot, August 12-15 

McHenry County Fair 
August 4-8 

Grayslake Spirit of '76 
August 11-14 

Fox Lake Firemen's 
Festival July 23-25 




How Many Times Can You Register? 

You can register as many fish per week as you like but you can 
win only one prize per week. The judges will give you the benefit 

of the largest prize per week. 



When Are Winners Chosen? 

At 8:30 a.m. on the Monday following the previous week's 
contest, entries are sorted at Happy Acres, Rte 173, and the Fox 
River. Any interested party may be present to watch the 
proceedings. Soon as the winners are known -the 'claiming station 
that registered the winner will be notified by phone and a letter 
will be mailed to the winner notifying him to pick up his prize at. 
'the claiming station. If this is not convenient, we will ship same 
to all winners. - ^ 



ICI 




in 




in O' Lakes 




-: 




Derby 



Chain O* Lakes 
Resort Owner s Association 




ANTIOCH. ILLINOIS 

60002 



State Bank 
of Antioch. 111. 










■ 




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Pepsi Cola 
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STATUES- Statues by Mr. and Mrs. Bickel 



Page, 17 



TIME 

when pharmacists 
were catted "doc" 





Today the pharmacist 
is a specialist in com-; 
pounding and dispens- 
ing drugs for the real 
"docs." We're part of 
their team! 








Stephen Bickel removing mold from another creation. 



The World of l Statuxiry 



Statues, statues, hundreds 
of interesting and beautiful 
statues. Everything from a 
small, hand-sized turtle to a 
350 pound Chinese lady. This 
is what you will find at ' the 
LOON LAKE TRADING 
POST just south of Antioch on 
route 83. 

■ The fascinating thing about 
this is that Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen Bickel manufacture 
their concrete statuary 
themselves A better way of 
putting it would be to say that 
Stephen Bickel is the creator 
and Loretta Bickel is the 

decorator. 

The art of creating a fine 

statue is not a fast process, but 

takes at least three weeks of 

very! careful work. First, the 

pouring or molding of the 

statue and the first drying 

period; of two days. Next^ 

curing in a water tank for three 

days to a week and then air 

drying from one to two weeks 

before decorating. Each statue 

is hand decorated with two 

undercoats of paint before the 

final color is added and 

allowed to'dry. ' 

T h^B L N L A K E 
TRADING POST now has the 
largest display of concrete 
statuary in the state. The price 
for these fine works varies 
from 35 cents to $115. They 
have over a hundred different 
items: bird baths, fountains, 
dwarfs, planters, Chinese 
statues and on and on. 

Sometime, when you are 
heacliiig South on 83, stop in 
and step into the world of 
Statuary. 



a o o o ooo o Bo q oo o ooooooo oc 







OVER 150 DIFFERENT ITEMS 

Bird baths, animals, fountains, and 
pumps; Chinese lanterns, planters, 
also antiques and used merchandise. ; 

TRM)ING POST 

ON 83, i MILE S. OF f 173 

Antioch, 111. 
395-3857 

Open 7 days a week 

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WkuU.. MAWAGEP TO FEEP 2.(2. MEtf 
THREE MEALS A PAY DUfZIWG, MJOZLP. 
WAE. I-AT A TOTAL PAIUY Co'&t OF 
ONLY *40« HOW PIP THESE 
£COMOMICAL MEALS TASTE ? ASK 
AMY SOtPlER.' 



Reeves 



Phone 395-3606T 

901 Main Antioch 



Mrs. Bickel putting finishing touches on new statue. 




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THE ANTIOCH? NEWS S N* 18 WED./ JUL* 14,, 1071 



$.: 



"When you can go out the 
door of the school to 
something completely 
different, you've got it," said 
Dr. Douglas Wade at last 
Tuesday * night's special 
Antioch Grade. School Board; 
meeting summarizing 
Environmental Education. 

Dr. Wade, assistant 
professor in the Outdoor 
Teacher Education at Northern 
Illinois University and David 
Dropp of the Franz 
Lipp-Marvin Wehler 
Partnership attended the 
meeting to present a proposal 
for the preservation and 
utilization of the wildlife area 
around the new Upper Grade 
School. 

The proposal was accepted 
later in the meeting and will be 
put to use immediately. 

The area surrounding the 
grade school contains a natural 
creek, marshes, woodland and 
kettle depression. ''Sites like' 
this are rare," stressed Dr. 
Wade saying that he know of 
only one other comparable site 
adjacent to a school set up. 

Environmental education is 
relevant to the problems of 
today. With a gradual 
development of what, we have 
available at the Antioch Upper 
Grade School, Dr. Wade says 
we can make this an area that 
would enrich the community 
over-all. 

, Dr. Wade explains that 
putting the children outdoors, 
getting a view of nature 
removed from the "four 
walls", is what environmental 
education is all about. This 
proposal has been accepted 
with the intention that it will 
be of use to all area children 
from preschool through high 
age. 

Community involvement 
includes more than just 
monetary support. -Area 
experts in fish, birds, wild 
flowers could take this 
opportunity to share their 
knowledge with the students. 

Mentioned as a possibility 
for the site would be its 
becoming a demonstration 
center used by other schools, 
groups and educators 
instructing in wildlife. 

In discussing the 
community involvement 



possibilities In this project, Mr. 
Meyer, superintendent of the 
Antioch Grade School, said,"! 
hope that any person or group 
of people in the community 
interested. In nature and 
-conservation or In the 
educational aspects in any way 
will call me. We want total 
.community involvement and 
overall usage of the 
development." 

David Kropp of the Franz 
Lipp- Marvin Wehler 
Partnership of landscape 
architects presented his 
company's plan to the Board. 
This partnership has done 
similar work at many 
developments, homes and 
schools including Belolt 
College, and Stevenson High 
School. The background of the 
organization Includes the 
president's having worked for 
Jens Jensen who landscaped 
many Chicago parks, homes . 
and estates. 

Many of the natural areas . 
around the Antioch Upper 
Grade School could easily be 
destroyed by unwise planning 
of sports fields, pedestrian 
areas, etc. Proper planning 
however will preserve the 
beautiful natural wildlife area. 

What- the master plan 
provides is a transitional area 
between the land surrounding 
the landscaped area, around 
buildings and playing fields, 
and the undisturbed natural 
area. The proposal provides 
planning that would avoid 
pollution of the natural stream 
and destruction of wildlife. 

A very important aspect of 
this plan is the instructing of 
teachers to take utmost 
advantage of the area. 
Ennvironmental education 
requires that teachers know 
how to get the children 
involved. This is one of the 
areas in which Dr. Wade would 
offer his help. 

Students will actually take 
part in preparation 'of the area. 
They have the manpower and 
capability tor planting, etc. 
Mainly they will learn to 
explore the area, keeping logs 
of wildlife they find. They' 
would use the library to 
supplement their nature study. 
i Dr. Wade points out that 



ultimately all aspects of 
student education are tied In 
with environment An example 
of this Is the iterestlng history 
of pur area resulting In our 
present surroundings; the life 
of the Indian , rock change, 
population. 

The master plan divides the 
school site into several areas: 
The buildings, sports facilities, 
and roads; the transitional area, 
a gradual return to wildlife; 
and the natural area where the 
wildlife remains ' completely 
undisturbed. K 

The $5200 contract with 
the Franz Lipp-Marvin Wehler 
Partnership consists of 
preparation of a long-term, 
phased, total schematic plan 
for the Upper Grade School 
Site with the first step, grading, 
beginning very soon. 

Along with taking an 
Inventory of the plants and 
wildlife already present, they 
will also plan what would be 
planted time of planting, 
amounts of plants, soil, etc. 

The upper Grade School has 
the alternative of doing' all or 
part of the work through its 
own crew and students. Or the 
Franz Lipp-Marvin Wehler 
Partnership will supervise, any 
or ' all contracted work, 
analyzing the bids, approving 
plants and materials. Their fee 
would be -3% of the 
contractor's price. They could 
then offer their expertise and 
guarantee the plants and 
material. 



Pressure of Seawater 
Solidifies the Marsh 

On e-and-a- third million 
tons of seawater are being 
loaded on 63 acres of spongy 
marshland in order to /com- 
press it into a firm, solid foot- 
ing on which to expand the 
$175-millioft Elizabeth, N. J., 
marine-terminal, now under 
construction. 

The water is lifted out of 
"adjacent Newark Bay and is 
contained . in two reservoirs 
covering the 63 acres. The 
reservoirs have sand dikes 
and are lined with imperme- 
able polyvinyl chloride 
(PWC) sheeting made by the 
Goodyear Tire & Rubber 
Company especially for this 
purpose. 

It fills the reservoirs to a 
depth of more than 20 feet 
and exerts a pressure of some 
1,400 pounds per square foot 
against the spongy soil be- 
neath the plastic liners. 

Toward the end of this 
year, the weight of that water 
will have compressed the soil 
by three or four feet, turning 
it into solid ground on which 
warehouses, roads and docks 
can be built. Then the water 
will be returned to Newark 
Bay, the. plastic liners re- 
moved, and the sand dikes 
leveled. As a result, 63 acres 
of usable land will have been 
added to the new port facility. 




LITTLE MISS 
PEANUT QUEEN 



Chaln-O-Lakes area girls 
between the ages of 6 and 8 are 
invited by the Kiwanls Club of 
Chaln-O-Lakes Antioch to 
participate in the 1971 Little 
Miss Peanut Contest ' ,. 

THE COMPETITION WILL 
BE LIMITED TO THE FIRST 
TWENTY-FIVE WHO 
ENTER. Competition will be 
judged at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday 
July 21 at the Antioch Savings 
and Loan Assoc., 425 Lake 
Street/ Antioch. 

Parents & Public Invited 

Contestants will be judged 
on poise, pertness and 
personality. Children of 
Kiwanls members not eligible. 
Winner will receive prizes and 
gifts donated by the merchants 
of Antioch. Each contestant 
will receive a personal gift from 
Frank ReCupldo, president of 
the Kiwanls Club of 
Chaln-O-Lakes Antioch. , 





Antioch Assembly 
Initiates 

A pot luck supper began the 
July 12th meeting of the 
Antioch Assembly. Two new 
members were initiated, Cindy 
Plotz and Susan Plett. 
Congratulations, Girls! 

Grand Assembly will be 
held at the Conrad Hilton in 
Chicago July 17-19. 

Antioch Assembly is very 
busy planning summer projects 
such as the rummage sale. 

Wheeling Assembly is having 
a Friends Night July 27 and 
some of the girls are planning 
to attend. 



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•I School attending 



LITTLE MISS PEANUT CONTEST 

ENTRY BLANK 
Kiwanis Club Chain-Q-Lakes Antioch 

... ... , 

Contestants must reside in the Cbain-O-Lakes area: 

Antioch, Lake Villa, Lindenhurst, Fox Lake, Spring 
Grove, Grayslake, Ingleside, or Round Lake. They must 
be she years, but not nine years of age on or before 
August 1, 1971« 

Name of child 



Address 



Town 



Names of Parents 



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Mail entry blanks to: 



Frank ReCupido 
Contest Coordinator 
First National Bank 
Antioch, III. 60002 




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; American Legion Auxiliary Neivst 



There "will be a New, 
C 1 1 i z e n ' s -,R e ce p 1 1 on , 
co-sponsored by the 10th [ 
District American Legion and 
the Auxiliary on Tuesday, July 
20th at 8 p.m. at the Homer 
Dahringer American Legion 
Home in Wauke|an. 

Co-chairmen are William 
Franzen, Libertyville, District 
. Senior Vice-Commander-Elect; 
a n d •Mrs. Edwin Bradtke, 
Gurnee, District Auxiliary 
Americanism Chairman. 
' The district colors will be 
presented by the Gurnee 
American Legion/ Honor 
Guard, led by District 
Sergeant- at- Arms, Ed Jahneke. 
Invocation will be given by 
Mrs. Richard Brady, Gurneje 
District Auxiliary Chaplain. 

Mrs. J. Bronson Gridley, 
Lake Bluff, Regent, North 
Shore Chapter, D. A. R., will say 
"The Pledge of Allegiance". 

Mrs. Ray Panzer, Gurnee, 

will lead the audience in 

. singing the National Anthem, 

accompanied by Mrs. Ray 

Suzzi, High wood. 

Addresses of welcome will 
be said by Mrs. Robert Broege 
of Deerfleld, District President; 
and' District Commander 
George Fluger of Vernon. 

"The Flag Speaks", a 
manuscript, Will r be read by 
Mrs. Thomas Booth, 
Waukegan, Women's/ Relief 
Corps (WRC) of the Grand 
•Army of the Republic (GAR). 
-The guest speaker is Lake 
County Sheriff, Orville "Pat" 
Clayey of Gurnee, well known 
in this .vicinity both as former 
Lake County Coroner and in 
his present capacity as Lake 
County Sheriff. His talk will 
concern the meaning of 
"Americanism". 

"I Am a Flag", a reading, 
will be recited by Mrs. Louis 
Thompson of the Waukegan 
281 American Legion 
-Auxiliary. Entertainment will 
be musical selections from the 
Senior Citizen's "Kitchen 
Bank" of Zion. 

Some 40 new citizens will 
receive their naturalization 
papers from Lake County 
Circuit Court Clerk Mrs. 
Stephanie Sulthin of Lake 
Bluff. 

Presentations will be make 
by Americanism chairmen 



from the Waukegan and North 
Shore Chapters of the DAR, 
tjie WRC, the Waukegan 
American Legion Auxiliary, 
the National Daughters of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, 
and the Ladies Auxiliary of 
World War I. Veterans/" 

Mrs. Panzer will sing 
"America*, with the audience, 
the district colors will be 
retired, and District Legion 
Chaplain George Robbins of 
Zion will give the benediction. 

AH American Legion Posts 
and Units, other participating 
organizations, are asked to post 
their flags at 7: 30 p.m. so that 
there ^ may be a massed 
background display of colors 
for the reception. 

Refreshments will be served 
by the American Legion 
Auxiliaries of Mundelein, 
Round Lake, .Vernon, 
Wauconda and Winthrop 
Harbor. 

Mrs. John L. Horan, 
Antioch Unit Americanism 
Chairman, said that all new 
citizens receptions are open to 
the public. . 



CENSUS SURVEY 
THIS WEEK 

The Bureau of the Census 
will conduct a survey of em- 
ployment and unemployment 
In this area during the. week of 
July 19, Curtis T. Hill, Director 
of the Bureau's regional office 
in Chicago announced today. 

This' survey is conducted 
monthly by the Bureau for the 
U.S. Department of Labor in a 
scientifically designed sample 
of households throughout the 
entire United States. The 
e ni pi oy m?nt and 
unemployment statistics which 
are based on the results of this 
survey are used to provide a 
continuing measure of the 
economic health of the Nation. 

For example,' in May- the 
survey indicated) that there 
were 84.1 million men and 
women in the civilian labor 
force; 6.2 percent were out of 
work as compared v with 6.1 
percent of the 83.8 million 
persons in the April labor 
force. The figures are adjusted 
for seasonal changes. 

Facts . supplied by 
individuals participating in the 
survey are kept strictly 
confidential by law, and the 
results , are used only i to 
compile statistical totals. 



Flaschner Becomes 
Commercial Manager 

Denis C. Flaschner, 340 
Park Ave., is Illinois Bell's new 
commercial manager in the 
Elgin business office. 

Flaschner, who had been 
marketing staffs supervisor in 
i Chicago, begairKIs Illinois Bell 
career in 1959 as a commercial 
representative in Antioch. 
Since then he has held a 
number of marketing 
assignments. 

A native of Chicago, 
Flaschner attended the 
University of Wisconsin. He is 
active in Cub Scouting and 
Little League baseball and his 
hobbies are golf, swimming, 
bowling, and fishing. 

He and his wife Jacquelyn 
have four children - Denis II, 9; 
Dawn, 7; Donna, 4 and Dean, 
IVi 



DOCTOR RE-ELECTED 
TO AAGP MEMBERSHIP 

KANSAS CITY, 
MO.»Adolph N. Berke, M.D.. 
Antioch has been re-elected - to 
active membership in the Am- 
erican Academy of General 
Practice, the national assoc- 
iation of family doctors. Re- 
•election signifies that the 
physjeian has successfully co- 
mpleted 150 hours of 
accredited postgraduate med- 
ical study in the last three 
years. Members become eligible 
for re-election at the end of the 
third year following their elec- 
tion to membership. The 
Academy, the country's second 
largest national medical assoc- 
iation, is the only national 
medical group that requires 
members to keep up with 
medical progress through cont- 
inuing education. 

. The Academy, founded in 
1947 and headquartered f in 
Kansas^ City,": Mo., has been 
instrumental in the establish- 
ment of a new primary medical 
specialty in family practice. 
The new specialty is expected 
to increase the numbers of 
family physicians available to 
serve the public in the future. 
The Academy's postgraduate 
education program is the foun- 
dation of eligibility for family 
doctors now in practice who 
apply for certification in the 
new specialty. 




IRA Hits Mid-Season 



This .coming week will see 
the IRA super modifieds, and 
sportsman stock cars in 
mid-season championship 
racing with extra distance in all 
the feature events. 

The super modifieds will 
race in a 40 lap feature on 
Wednesday night July 14 at the 
Raceway Park Blue Island, 
asphalt track where point 
leader Johnny Reimer will be 
favored. However Whitey 
Harris,' Lake Villa, won there 
test week and another win this 
week could put him back into 
the top spot at that track. 
Harris has three feature race 

wins there and Reimer has only , 
two. with 'only a 25 point 
advantage in the standings. 

At the Kenosha County 
Speedway, in Wilmot the super 
modifieds will, again, try to 
upset point leader Johnny 
Reimer but the mid-season 
honors will go to the 
sportsman stock cars of. IRA. 
Point leaderin this division is 
Jack Ashenbrenner, Hales 
Corners who had two feature 
wins at Wilmot to his credit to 
top all others but in the 30 lap 
championship race he will be 
hard .pressed by his close 
running competitor Wes Eckert 
of Greenfield, Wis. 

On Sunday July 18, the 
super modifieds return to 
mid-season Championship 
racing with another 40 lap 
feature race at .the Lake 
Geneva Raceway. Here too 
Harris leads Reimer in the 
number of feature wins and has 
the top position in the point 
standings. - 

There is no secret that 
Reimer will be out to top all 
competition at this track in the 
mid-season title go because 
that would give him the point 
lead at that track too and it 
would mark the first time this 
season that any driver has led 
at all four of the IRA circuit 
tracks. Reimer is fourth in the 
standings and it is clear that Al 
Schill, who won the first 
feature of the season at Lake 



S?!*^**?!**!^^ 



THE ANTtOCH NEWS WED., JULY 14, 1971 Page 1» 




- - • . 




Dave Gutowski, Tom Gutowski, Bret Francke and Terry O'Brien 
of the Tigers Little League team sponsored by the State Bank are 
shown with three prizes for the Annual Panrato Breakfast on 
July 17. PANCAKE BREAKFAST!! 



The Antioch Little League 
Annual Pancake Breakfast will 
be held Sat July 17 from 7 
a.m. til 1 p.m. at the Antioch 
Methodist Church, 848 Main 
St. 

The following prizes are on 
display at the State Bank of 
Antioch: 

lst-19" RCA Black & 
White Portable TV donated by i 
State Bank of Antioch 



2nd— A.M. K^ Charmglow 
B a r - B - Q donated by 
CharmgloW Products Inc. 

3kt-$25 Series "E" Bond 
donated by First National 
Bank of Antioch 

Tickets will be on sale at the 
door. 



Geneva and runner up Roger 
Otto, Burlington, will be out to 
upset the plans of both Harris 
and Reimer. 

In August, when the super 
modifieds return to the Santa 
Fe Park Speedway in Willow 
Springs, Illinois, they will be 
racing in a 50 lap mid-season 
championship title event: 
Reimer leads in point standings) 
at this track with Harris in 
second spot. ' 



Iht Olrtfmti, 




"If absence makes I he 
heart grow fonder, maiiy 
people love their church." 




having another 





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TOa; JULY 14, 1971 



Ant. swimmers 



place 3rd 



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NOTES 



SWIMMERS 
TAKE BRENTWOOD 

... From the opening medley . 
relay to the closing free relay, 
the Antioch Swim Team 
dominated the swim meet with 
Brentwood of Waukegan. The 
Antioch Swimmers, sponsored 
by the State Bank of Antioch, 
piled up an impressive win 
2001 55. 

After winning the medley 
relay, the Antioch Team swept 
first and second place in the 
next four races for a perfect 
start. Antioch's domination 
continued as. they took both 
first and second place in seven 
other races. 

Special credit goes to 
Johnny Schmidt and Bob 
Dodd who were triple winners. 
Both boys swam on the 
winning medley relay team and . 
later Johnny took firsts . in 
freestyle and back stroke and 
Bob took firsts in freestyle and 
butterfly. 

Seven swimmers were 
double winners, scoring first 
place victories in two races. 
They were Judy Houghton, 
Jenny Schmidt, Jack Fields, 
Mary St. Pierre, Tim Waite, 
Frank Abderholderi, and Mike 
Muro. 

Swimmers with one first 
place, and second or thirds in 
other races also added 
important points. Those 
swimmers were Carol Berry, 
Scott Reeves, Dave Berry, Sue 
Berry, Jody Fields, Barb Dodd 
and Pat Muro. Additional first 
place winners were Linda 
Fields and David Walpole. 
. Back-up points in second 
and third place finishes were 
added . by Jeannie Cilik, Steve 
Haley, Jerry Schmidt, Charlene 
Uresy, Rick Sampolinski, Bill 
Garrets, Denise Shepard, Kim 
Klopp, Ed Berry, Judy Berry, 
Greg Shepard, John Kakacek, 
Sue Solomon, Kit Kakacek, m 
and Sue Hollenhorst. 

Antioch's divers John 
Kakacek, Suzy Berry, Kim 
Klopp, and Jody Fields added 
points also. 





^VACATION 

•see 

Here's a new wrinkle on how 
to look great when you get 
where you're going: Unpack 
the clothes you expect to wear - : 
first and hang them on the 
shower curtain rod over the 
bathtub. Then turn on the hot 
water and let the steam* rise. 
Wrinkles will fall out after a 
half hour and natural fabrics 
will dry quickly and smoothly. 
* ". 

For traveling with a freer 
mind, the small premium for 
complete insurance on your^ 
luggage, clothes and personal - 
possessions is a great 
investment. 

* * 



The Antioch Swim Team, 
each member in his bright red 
suit, was a standout as they 
took part in the North 
Suburban Conference Relays 
this.past weekend. 

Coming from behind in the 
first event, 8 and under boys' 
100 meter freestyle relay, to 
place a solid first place, they 
set the pattern for the rest of 
the meet. Antioch finished the 
meet in third place upsetting. 
Lake Forest, Old Willow 



DOWN BY THE SEASIDE 

With beachgoing season 
coming up, you're probably 
looking forward to leaving 
your footprints in the sands of 
summertime. «■'... 

If so, health experts, have a 
word of advice: Keep your 
eyes on your feet. It's true that 
going unshod on a beach is one 
of the best of foot exercises. 
But there are hazards. One is 
the danger of cutting yourself 



recently available only by pre 
acription but now on sale 
acroos-the-counter at drug 
stores; 

Athlete's foot afflicts 75 
percent of Americans at some 
time in their lives. Danger sig- 
nals include between-the-toes 
cracking, peeling or itching. 
Watch for these signs. Treating 
the infection at the beginning 
can make . the difference be- 
tween a happy or a spoiled 
vacation in the end. ', 



(Glenview) _ and Brentwood 
(Waukegan) in that order. Only , 
Plum Grove (Palatine) and 
Tennaqua (Deerfield) beat the 
local team. It was a nip and 
tuck meet from beginning to 
end with less than 50 points 
separating the first four teams. 

Antioch fielded a relay in every 
event, using several 
inexperienced swimmers, but 
did not disqualify in a single 
event. Antioch was the only 
team that did not have any 
disqualifications. 

Fighting back from behind, . 
young John Schmidt overcame 
the leading swimmer as he 
anchored his freestyle relay 
with a tremendous burst of 
speed for a first place. Helping 
celebrate their first place were 
Rick Sampolinski and Teddy 
and Craig White. Another high 
point of the exciting meet was 
the double win by the 11/12 
year old girls. This team, 
consisting of Suzy Berry, Eva 
Auxier, Lynda Fields and Mary 
St. Pierre, placed first in both 
the 100 meter freestyle and 
backstroke relays. Frank 
Abderholden, Mike Jaworek, 
Robby Neuroth and Terry Lear 
got a sound first in the 
14/under 100 meter 
backstroke relay. Frank' and 
Terry . then moved up the 
16/under 200 meter breastroke 
relay with Pat Muro and Ed 
Berry to take another first 
place. 

Second place finishes went 
to: 10/under 100 meter 
backstroke, Jack Fields, 
Johnny Schmidt, Scott 
Gallagher, Bill Garrels; 16/un- 
der 200 meter backstroke, 
Mike Muro, Kevin Walpole, . 
Dave and Ed Berry; 16/under 
200 meter girls backstroke, 
Judy Berry, Kit Kakacek, Barb 
Dodd, Charlene Uresy; 10/un- 
der 100 meter breastroke, Judy 
Houghton, Jeannie Cilik, Judi 
Hay den, Jenny Schmidt; 16/- , 
under girls 200 meter 
breastroke, Judy Berry, Barb 
Dodd, Sue Hollenhorst,. and 
Charlene Uresy. 

Special mention ought to be 
made of the very excellent job 
Craig White and Rick 
Sampolinski did. Both only 6 
years old, these boys swam 
with Steve Haley and Dave 
Walpole in the 10/under 100 
meter breastroke, giving the 
, team a third place finish 
against other teams made up of 
mostly 9/10 year olds! 
Fifty-four swimmers and their 
parents combined to give this 
fine effort in the relays. 





^v.V**U iimi; ^// 




Sweating is vital to health and life because H is the body's way of 

regulating its own tamporaturo! 



on broken glass, a sharp-edged 
can or other litter. Judicious 
use of sandals can. reduce the 
risk. 

Another common peril is 
the fungus infection that 
causes athlete's foot. It's easy 
to pick up the infection in the 
public showers and dressing 
rooms that are part of the 
beach-holiday scene. Luckily, 
athlete's foot can be self-medi- 
cated without interfering with 
your enjoyment. A fungicide 
favored by specialists is Tinac- 
tin (cream or solution) until 




RACING 

1ATE MODEL SUPER & HOBBY STOCKS 



FRI. NIGHT JULY 16 
All American Hell Drivers Thrill Show 

SAT. NIGHT JULY 17 
SUN. NIGHT JULY 18 

Late Models Super Stock Care & : Hobhy Stock* 

plus 
Added Attraction Sunday. Night Demolition Race 





Va Ml. EAST OF RTE. 41 ON WASHINGTON ST. 
WEATHER PHONE 662=8200 



■ Vanities & 




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cabinets on display. 

ready for immediate delivery 

Kitchen cabinets 



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Visit our Display Room 




Bring your measurements for free estimate 
Installation & Financing available 



Lumber 



1 MILE W. OF RT. 59 
-ON GRASS LAKE RD. 

OPEN 7:30 a.m.-5-OO p.m. CLOSED SUNDAY 

PHONE 312-395-1272 312-395-0800 




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THE ANTIOCH NEWS 

WED. t JULY 14, 1971 



Page 21 



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Waukegan Speedway 



July 10, 1971 — There were 
two new feature winners at the 
Waukegan Speedway Saturday 
night as defending champion 
Ray Young of Doiton won a 
close 30 lap main and Mrs 
Cheyrl Arndt of Milwaukee 
won her first hobby feature 
ever. 

,i Young, who won the late 
model crown at Waukegan in 
1969 and 1970, got his first 
win of the year at Waukegan as 
he won the trophy dash and 
' then took the feature lead in 
the fourth lap. For the final 20 
laps Bob May of Gurnee, the 
current point leader, pounded 
at Young's rear bumper trying 
for the lead, but Young held 
out for the win. 

In the final lap May hit 
Young hard enough to push a 
protective bar into Young's 
'rear tire and smoke billowed 
from Young's car in the final 
naif lap. Waukegan's Jim Coss- 
man was right behind Young 
and May just waiting for either 
to slip. 

The race was stopped in the 
fifth lap after early leader Dave 
Stirsman of Highland Park 
crashed nearly head-on into the 
homestretch wall. Tempers 
Were hot as Stirsman figured 
Gary Zobel of Mundelein had 
intentionally run him in the 
wall. 

In the 100 lap race a week 
previous, these two had col- 
lided with Zobel seriously dam- 
aging his cat Several other 
incidents between these two 
drivers prompted officials to 
issue warnings to each driver. 

There were two serious ap- 
pearing accidents as the rain 
clouds hovered over the Speed- 
way. In. the first late model 

heat race Roy Acuff of Chi- 
cago jumped over the rear tire 
of Tom Credit of Melrose Park. 
Acuff s car became airborne 
while Credit's car spun. The 
front bumper of Acuff s car 
came through the driver's wi- 
ndow and door knocking 
Credit's seat loose. There were 
no injuries. 

In the first hobby stock 
heat race, Rip Tucker of Park 
City was rushed to St. Therese 
Hospital with a painfully spra- 
ined ankle and leg cuts as his 
left leg was trapped between 
sheet metal and the. clutch 
when the driver's door was 
ripped off. Tucker later ret- 
urned to the track on crutches. 

Two other cars were invol- 
ved with Floyd Burdick of 
Racine being momentarily 
knocked out. 

The hobby feature exper- 
ienced several delays, but when 
it was all over Cheyrl Arndt 
scored a narrow win over Tom 
Edwards of Zion. Bob Klemm 
of Gurnee finished third in the 
race. W 

Al Gutche of Bristol won 
the third late model heat race 
and finished fourth: in the 30 
lap feature. Holiday feature 
winners Tom Jones of North- 
brook : and 1 Carl -Major of 
Chicago finished 5th and 6th in 
Saturday's main event 




SUNDAY 

July 11, 1971- McHenry's 
Bob Anzinger>became the sec- 
ond new feature winner in the 
late model class this weekend 
at the Waukegan Speedway as 
he won the 30 lap main in near 
record time. Nineteen cars star- 
ted the race and they all fin- 
ished, with 11 of them on the 
same lap with the leader. 

Cheryl Arndt of Milwaukee 
won the hobby stock feature 
and she did set a new track 
record there as well as in the 
fast heat race. Fourteen of 18 
starters finished that race. 

Anzinger, who now plans to 
race regularly at Waukegan on 
Sunday evenings, outdistanced 
Ray Young of Dolton in the 
third heat race and then got a 
break early in the feature 
which enabled him to build up 
a good lead. 

Bob Roper of Chicago star- 
ted pole position and led for 
the first five laps before 
Anzinger got by in the first 
turn. Young was second at that 
point and kept the pressure on 
Roper for 10 laps before taking 
over second spot. 
. In the next two laps Carl 
Major of Chicago shot from 
fourth to second with Young, 
Roper and Tom/Jones of Nor- 
thbrook switching back and 
forth for third place money, 

Anzinger had a Va lap lead at 
the checkered with Major in 

second followed by Roper, 
Young, Jones, Jim Cossman of 
Waukegan, Al Gutche and fast- 
est qualifier, Bob May. • 

The preliminaries were plen- 
ty close with. Young winning 
the dash after a tussle with 
Major. The second heat race 
also turned out to be close as 
Cossman edged out Frank 
Cabrera of Chicago and Gut- 
che. ■ 

In a special backwards- 
forwards race, Tom Reutter of 
Gurnee but-foxed ten other 
cars for the win. The All Amer- 
ican Hell Drivers will be at the 
Speedway next Friday night 
starting at 8 p.m. 

6nce a year the Waukegan 
Speedway leases its facilities to 
a thrill show and this year the 
All American Hell Drivers will 
be taking over the track this 
Friday July 16. 

This thrill program will fea- 
ture the American Motors pro- 
ducts from near-by Kenosha in 
the usual precision driving plus 
crashing older cars and the now 
famous ramp-to-ramp jump. 

In additidh there will be 

clown antics to entertain the 

, whole family in the 22 event 

'program..- v. . 





AUTO RACING 



Chamber Members 

See 
White Sox- Brewers 

_ One of the highlights of the 
Chamber of Commerce annual 
baseball outing in Milwaukee 
on June 30 was having the 
their name up in lights being 
welcomed, by the Fan-a-Gram. 
Some 62 members of the 
Aiitioch Chamber of 
Commerce had a wonderful 
time watching the Brewers play 
the White Sox in this big 
doubleheader. 




All American Hell Divers 






Fri.Hite July IB 8 p.m. 

WAUKEGAN SPEEDWAY 

Vi Ml. EAST OF ATE. 41 ON WASHINGTON ST. 
WEATHER PHONE 6624200 




TOeTUJCOUOR 

Gloss House Paint $ " 5 
Latex House Paint »■« 



$7.95 

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over 1300 colors to choose from 





PAINT & GLASS 

392 LAKE ST. 395-0229 

HOURS: DAILY 8-5:30 FRI. TILL 9 






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THE ANTIOCH NEWS 




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WED., JULY 1 4, 19 71 



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Babe | 
the 



Tom Anderson Wilis 




TERRIFIC tom TOPS IRA 

WILMOT FEATURE '■'■ 

A new winner wheeled his. 
car into victory circle at the 
Kenosha County Speedway 
Saturday night in one of the 
most impressive drives made by 
any driver on the IRA Circuit 
of super, modifieds this season. 
Tom "Terrific" Anderson, Ant- 
ioch won the 30 lap feature 
after moving from his 6th star- 
ting spot to take 3rd from all 
Schill, Franksville on the 3rd 
lap; second from Ron Bergsma, 
Richmond on the 8th lap and 
the lead from Roger Otto, Bur- 
lington on the next tap. 

Two laps later Otto was out 
of the race with injuries from a 
broken and shattered trans- 
mission. His injuries were treat- 
ed at the track and he was 
reported to be OK with only 
minor cuts and bruises on his 
legs and. knees. 

The win by Anderson was 
no surprise to his fans who 
have watched him closely miss 
the front spot several times this 
season and last season. Point 
leader Johnny Reimer, Cale- 
donia and defending champion 
Whitey Harris, Lake Villa were 
carrying on a three way battle 
with Bill Bonn, Kenosha until 
Harris spun and R. Dodd i Wau- 
kegan, stalled his car to avoid a 
crash. Harris couldn't get going 
until Dodd moved and by that 
time Harris was a lap down 
from the field. He raced back 
to run behind the fourth place 
finisher, Schill, at the end. 
Reimer moved up to' 3rd but 
couldn't get close to challenge 
Bergsma who was three car 
lengths back of Anderson at 
the finish 

Threatening showers caused 
a change in the schedule of 
events and the feature race, 
honoring the town of Bristol, 
Wisconsin, was run ahead of 
the semi-feature. It was the 
semi-feature however, rather 
than the attendance which had 
set new records for the past 
three weeks, that set a new 
Wilmot record. The 24 car field 
was reduced to 13 cars after a 
record 7th restart before the 
checkered flag fell to Joe Mou- 
lts, McHenry. 

Heat races were won by Bob 
Lawrance, St. Paul; Minnesota; 
Dick St John, Cudehey; Jim 
Cameron, Kenosha; Shcill and 
Paul Cameron, Round Lake. 

Once again it was Eddie 
Loomis, Waukasha setting fast 
time with the quickest lap rec- 
orded this, year at Wilmot at 
17.48 seconds. 

Sportsman stock car point 
leader Jack Ashenbrenner, 
Hates Corners, again set fast 
time and won the feature with 
heat race wins going to Dale 
Erdman, Caledonia; Wes Eck- 
ert, Greenfield; and Butch 
Mierendorph, Kenosha. After a 
double roll over in the semi- 
feature by Bill Christensen, 
Franksville, Ron Netuspki, 
Kenosha was declared the win- 
ner ± after he and Erdman 



mmim$ 




The Antioch All-Star 
Ruth Team under 
leadership of manager Mr. 
Underbill beat the Barrington 
Nationals 8 to 4 for the 
District Championship on 
Saturday, July 10. This was a 
first for Antioch and the 
AllStar Babe Ruth Team. 

On their way to the 
championship Antioch beat the 
Barrington Americans team 31 
to 1 with Tom Underhill the 
winning pitcher. In their 
second game Antioch beat 
Marengo 8 to 4 with Mark 
Maras getting the win. 

In the. championship -game 
Antioch beat Barrington 
Nationals 8 to 4 with Tom 
Underhill getting the win. 

First baseman Joe 
Mihovilovich was- one of the 
stand outs both with the bat 
and outstanding defensive play. 

The team now moves on to 
the Area Tournament taking 
on West Cicero in their first 
game this coming Saturday at 2 
p.m. at the Antioch High 
School baseball field 





MID-SEASON CHAMPIONSHIP 

WEEKEND 

- " • '-•• "-"•■-■• -■•■ -."• . 

' ■■•■—--'■■.■ ■" 

EXCITEMENT ON THE 
SUPER CIRGUIT 

JULY 17 Kenosha County Speedway. 

Wilmot, Wis. | 

LAP SPORTSMAN STOCK CAR FEATURE| 

JULY 18 Lake Geneva Raceway | 

Lake Geneva, Wis. | 

40 LAP SUPER MODIFIED FEATURE I 

- Time Trials 7:(W|xiii^^- Races 8:30 J 

Pace car - John Teres Chev-Olds, Antioch ■■ 



CAR CARE-, 






TY GOES 
BILLS 



TO BUFFALO 



collided on the front straight- 
away. The collision ripped the 
nearly full gasoline tank out of 
Ron's car and the fuel had to 
be burned off the track before 
the feature race cars could start 
their event: 

Attendance was 3025 and 
the piirse was $3656.00. 



HARRIS IN HAIR-RAISING 
WIN AT LAKE GENEVA 

Whitey Harris, Lake Villa, 
was pressed to hang onto his 
lead in the point standing at 
Lake Geneva Raceway on Sun- 
day night as overall point lead- 
er Johnny Reimer tried to take 
away the lead and the top stop 
in one of the longest wheel to 
wheel races run so far. Harris 
took second on the 18th lap 
and Reimer followed thru as 
Harris took the lead from Joe 
Moulis, McHenry. 

Then for the' next 10 laps 
Harris and Reimer raced wheel 
to wheel with Harris finishing 
only a half car length over 
Reimer. 

-The close race was watched 
by the largest crowd at Lake 
Geneva this year and possibly 
the largest ever race crowd. 

Heat race winners were 
Gary Weise; Al Schill; Jim 
Boehles; and Jim Sullivan. The 
semi feature was won by Weise. 

Sportsman stock car events 
were won by Wes Eckert who 
took' not only the feature race 
win but the heat as well while 

fast time qualifier Jack Ashen- 
brenner took third in both the 
heat the feature. Cal Clark fin- 
ished second in each event. 

The attendance of 3496 
contributed to a $2334.00 
purse. 



Tyrone Walls is now on his 
way to Buffalo, N. Y. training 
camp for the Buffalo Bills foot- 
ball team. ' 

After prolonged negot- 
iations last week, Tyrone 
signed a one year contract with 
the Buffalo Bills. He will be a 
running back on the team for 
the coming season. 

Tyrone is a 1967 Antioch 
High School graduate and he 
hopes to visit with his many 
Antioch friends during the 
Christmas holidays. 

Studying at the University 
of Missouri, Tyrone has been 
working on his degree in soc- 
iology with a minor in business 
education. He plans to com- 
plete his education at the first 
opportunity. 



^fivery time you drive in the- 
irain, your- vehicle is subject to 
a phenomenon called "hydro- 
planing," especially if most of 
the tread is worn off your tires. 

What happens is that the 
tires, at certain speeds, usually 
between 60 and 60 mph, will 
ride on a film of water rather 
than on the road surface. When 
this occurs; it can be dangerous 
because tile driver has no con- 
trol for steering or braking. 

The depth of the water has a 
lot to do with hydroplaning. 
But a car is more likely to 
"water ski" at speeds of be- 
tween 30 and 40 mph if the 
water .depths exceeds the tire 
tread depth, and particularly if 
the road surface is hard and 
smooth such as. asphalt or ice. 
It is less likely to happen on 
heavily textured surfaces and if 
tires have deep treads. This 
allows water to squirt through 
rather than build up a wedge in 
front of each. tire. 



..!.*. 1 _,-,_^j_-__ 



WOMEN GOLFERS 
COMPETE 



.Competition increases as the 
State Bank Women's Golf 
League begins its sixth week of . 
play. ", 

In v first place with 18%-- 
points is Tean No. 2 made up 
of Dolores Scarpelli, Ruth 
Pickus, Lugene Nissen, Sally 
Hawkins and Phyllis 
Kapischke. 

In second place Is Team No. 
8 with 17 points with Jean 
Daniel, Sara Fields, Jan 
Burdick, Irene Hahn and Karen 
Wilton. And in third place is 
Team No. 3 with 16% points. 
Members of Team 3 are 
Beverly Dodd, Carol Anderson, 
Gen Osmond, Marge Solar and ' 
Anne St. Pierre. 



■ 






Only one 90 is as tough as 
the Suzuki TS-90 Honcha 
The Suzuki TC-90 Blazer. 






>• 



' Pick a polr . Th« b tit 90'i bull*. 

Both with a rugged double cradle tub* from* 
and H horsepower. 

The TS-90 Honcho, built for enduro riding, 
hoi 5 speed). Black upswept muffler with spark 
arrai far. long travel forks. CCI automatic lube. 
Motocroii-type handlebars. And an optional 
"Mop-up" kit (hot boom th« ce's to 100, 
ihehptolT. 

The TC-90 Maxor, for dirt and 
street hoi an 8 speed dual-range 
transmission. Chroma muffler with 



•pork arrester. BrJdge-i rytad handlebar*. CO auto* 
mafic tuba.- And a high clearance front fender.- 

So, the real queitlen Isn't which 90 to buy. 
but which Suzuki 90. 

In the continental U.S., you con find The ' , 
Suzuki dealer nearest you for free, call. 8CK%o3 1 -4299**-' 
. U.S. Suiukl Molar Corporation, - 

^. 13767 Freeway Drive, Dapt. 4010, 
Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670. 
In Canada* Rodeo 
Sales, ltd., 1107 Homer St. 
Vancouver 3, B.C. 



£># 



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THE ANTIOCH NE^S 




WEa, JULY 14^ 1971 



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Page 23 





ooooooobooooooooooooooooooooooo 



I 



♦ 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXK>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOC 




• ■ 



MINOR LEAGUE STAGINGS THRU JULY10 



Dat*7/6/71 

Team 

Giants 
Pirates 

Yankees 
Tigers 



Score 'Pitchers 

7 Koch 

6. Vandermeer . • 

13 Don McGrain 

9 DaveGutowski 



Date-7/8/71 

Tigers 8 

Orioles 7 6 r 



Tom Gutowski 
Caldwell 



Red Division 

Cards 

Tigers 

Giants 

Cubs 

Braves 

Blue Division 

Yankees i * 
Pirates 



9 
9 
.5 
2 
1 



8 
8 



Sox 

Dodgers 

Angles 



6 
6 



5 
5 
10 



2 
2 
6 

9 s Games Wednesday, July 14 
10 Angels vs Pirates 

Cubs vs 

Dodgers * vs 

Cards. vs 

Sox 



3 
3 



vs 



Braves 

Giants 

Tigers 

Yankees 



Manager Phil Vos of the Lake County Lakers standing beside his 
star batter Sis Gallagher. 



Cardinals 
Pirates 

Date -7/9/71 

Cardinals 
' Giants 

Yankees 
Cubs 



8 MattBrophy 
7 Scott Smith' 



3 Brian Brophy 
2 Bougarts 



25 Pape 
16 



slo-o-ow pitch Sallies doing strong 



For some^real fun and lots 
olfaction, .get j)ut.to see our 
Lake County Lakers women s 
softball team at their home 
field at 1 Dugdale Park next 
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. 

With about 16 women on 
the team, lots of the 
action-makers come from our. 
area. On t the roster from 
Antioch are Wendy Jensen 
batting .350, Sis Gallagher 
batting .418, Marcia Fox and 
Diane Crandall. Diane's father 
was quite a star for the' 
Antioch team and Diane is 
doing well for the Lakers. 

The pitcher for the Lakers is 
Cheri Dalgaard v from Lake 

Villa. Also from Lake Villa are 
Jackie Vos batting .485 and 
Marge Murphy batting .380. 

Audrey Simek from Fox 
Lake is another team member 
and Debbie Kaminski, from 
Mundelein, is a star outfielder 
batting .311. 

In their third year in the 
Northeastern Women's 
Slo-Pitch League, the Lakers 
rank second with a 5-2 record. 
They play teams from as far as 
Joliet, Lombard and St. 
Charles. "We're really serious,!' 
says Jackie Vos and these girls 
really enjoy bringing home the 
trophies for playing their top 
quality girls' softball. 

The Lakers are sponsored 
by the State Bank of Antioch. 
This sponsorship takes care of 
fees, insurance, uniforms and 
other necessities for the team. 

Manager for the Lakers is 
Phil Vos from take Villa. Also 
from Lake J Villa are the 
coaches Jim Murphy and 
Streicher, who also handles 
publicity. : : v- 

Every Wednesday night at 6 
p.m. finds the girls at Lehman 
Park in Lake Villa where they 
practice their favorite sport for 
the games on weekends. 

Next home games for the 
Lakers are Sunday July 1 8 at 
7:30 p.m. and July 25 at 3:30 
p.m.. Get out and support 
these fine women athletes! 




Pitcher Audrey Simek of the Lake County Lakers. 




Pam Wickersheim up to bat for the Lake County Lakers Women's 
Softball team. 






■ 










Cardinal runner scores another run in their winning effort against 
the Giants 



Game of 



the week 



by DAVE RUSH 



The Cards did it again, 
squeaking by with a 3 to 2 
victory. 

The first inning wasn't too 
exciting with only Brophy, of 
the Cards, getting a hit and the 
Giants, garnering only one hit 
when Fagan cracked a double 
and threatened with a steal of 
third only to die there. 

Bogaerts, the Giant's 
pitcher, was pleased with the 
2nd inning when he made it 
three up and three down-and 
was even more pleased when 
two teammates, Koch, and 
Burris score in the Giant's half 
of the inning. Koch got on 
when he was hit by a pitched 
ball and Burris garnered a 
single. The only other base 
runner was the center fielder, 
Plechaty, as he reached 1st on 
an error by the short stop. 



. The third inning for the 
Cards was a pleasant one as 
Thompson came up with only 
one out and worked his way to 
1st base with a walk, later 
scoring. Eder came up with 2 
out and one on, cracked a 
single and soon scored. 

-Over the next two innings, 
Sheedlo is the only Giant to 
get a hit and can't put together 
any kind of a threat. 
- When the Cards come up 
one more run is let by. 
Thompson gets on base with a 
walk and is knocked around to 
home as Hass and Eder both 
smack singles. , 
Final 

Cardinals, 

errors 

Giants, 2 runs, 4 hits, 

3 errors. 

Winning pitcher, 

Brophy 

Losing pitcher, 

Bogaerts 



summary: 
3 runs, 3 hits, 











Giant Runner heads for second off teammate's hit. 












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